Changes in markers of cobalamin status after cessation of oral B-vitamin supplements in elderly people with mild cobalamin deficiency

S.J.P.M. Eussen, P.M. Ueland, G.J. Hiddink, J. Schneede, H.J. Blom, W.H.L. Hoefnagels, W.A. van Staveren, C.P.G.M. de Groot

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mildly cobalamin-deficient elderly were supplemented with 1000 g cobalamin (group C, n=34), 1000 g cobalamin with 400 g folic acid (group CF, n=31) or a placebo (n=30) for 6 months. Participants provided one single blood sample 3, 5 or 7 months after cessation of supplementation to monitor early changes in plasma concentrations of cobalamin, holotranscobalamin (holoTC) and methylmalonic acid (MMA). At the end of supplementation (groups C+CF), one participant met our criteria for mild cobalamin deficiency, as did 13, 14 and 43% of the participants assessed at respectively 3, 5 and 7 months post-supplementation. Cobalamin and holoTC declined on average with 47 and 56% relative to concentrations at the end of supplementation for the group assessed at 7 months post-supplementation. Essentially similar declines were observed for those participants assessed at 3 and 5 months post-supplementation. Mean MMA concentrations increased by 15% (P=0.07) in those participants assessed at 3 and 5 months post-supplementation, and increased by 50% (P=0.002) in those participants assessed at 7 months post-supplementation. Considering MMA as a sensitive tissue marker for cobalamin status, oral supplementation may afford adequate cobalamin status for a period of up to 5 months after cessation in the majority of participants
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1248-1251
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume62
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • pernicious-anemia
  • older-people
  • holotranscobalamin
  • trial
  • assay
  • serum
  • acid

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