Cell wall polysaccharides in black currants and bilberries-characterisation in berries, juice, and press cake

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109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cell wall polysaccharides from black currants and bilberries were characterised in three approaches. First, compositions of skin, pulp, and seeds show the distribution of polysaccharides over these tissues. A sequential extraction of cell wall material with different aqueous extractants informs about the extractability of the different polysaccharides, viz. pectins, hemicellulose, and cellulose. Finally, by isolation of cell wall polysaccharides from juice and press cakes obtained by the conventional juice manufacturing. The polysaccharide distribution was followed during juice processing. The main difference between bilberries and black currants is the dominant sugar residue in seeds: mannose for black currants and xylose for bilberries. Most of the hemicellulolytic sugars and cellulose can be found back in the press cake. The sugar composition of the press cake is similar to the composition of the residue after sequential extraction. Black currants contain more pectic sugars than bilberries. Consequently, a commercial enzyme used during processing releases more pectic material into the juice
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-488
JournalCarbohydrate Polymers
Volume59
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Keywords

  • hairy ramified regions
  • rhamnogalacturonan-ii
  • pectic polysaccharides
  • dietary fiber
  • chromatography
  • substances
  • fractions
  • cellulose
  • fruit
  • ca2+

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