Carry-over of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in dairy cows fed smoke contaminated maize silage or sugar beet pulp

L.A.P. Hoogenboom, A. Klop, R. Herbes, J.C.H. van Eijkeren, M.J. Zeilmaker, A.M. van Vuuren, W.A. Traag

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Abstract

Fires and improper drying may result in contamination of feed with PCDD/Fs and PCBs. To predict the impact of elevated feed levels, it is important to understand the carry-over to edible products from food producing animals. Therefore, a carry-over study was performed with maize silage contaminated by a fire with PVC materials, and with sugar beet pulp contaminated by drying with coal, containing particles from a plastic roof. Levels of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs in the maize silage were 0.93 and 0.25ng TEQ kg(-1), those in beet pulp 1.90 and 0.15ng TEQ kg(-1) (both on 88% dry matter (DM)). Dairy cows (3 per treatment) received either 16.8kg DM per day of maize silage or 5.6kg DM per day of sugar beet pellets for a 33-d period, followed by clean feed for 33days. This resulted in a rapid increase of PCDD/F levels in milk within the first 10days with levels at day 33 of respectively 2.6 and 1.7pg TEQ g(-1) fat for maize silage and beet pulp. Levels of dl-PCBs at day 33 were lower, 1.0 and 0.5pg TEQ g(-1) fat. In the case of the maize silage, the carry-over rates (CORs) at the end of the exposure were calculated to be 25% and 32% for the PCDD/F- and dl-PCB-TEQ, respectively. For the dried beet pulp the CORs were 18% and 35%. This study shows that the carry-over of PCDD/Fs and dl-PCBs formed during drying processes or fires can be substantial.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-220
JournalChemosphere
Volume137
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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