Carbon dioxide baited trap catches do not correlate with human landing collections of Anopheles aquasalis in Suriname

H. Hiwat-van Laar, R. Andriessen, M. de Rijk, C.J.M. Koenraadt, W. Takken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three types of carbon dioxide-baited traps, i.e., the Centers for Disease Control Miniature Light Trap without light, the BioGents (BG) Sentinel Mosquito Trap (BG-Sentinel) and the Mosquito Magnet® Liberty Plus were compared with human landing collections in their efficiency in collecting Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) aquasalis mosquitoes. Of 13,549 total mosquitoes collected, 1,019 (7.52%) were An. aquasalis. Large numbers of Culex spp were also collected, in particular with the (BG-Sentinel). The majority of An. aquasalis (83.8%) were collected by the human landing collection (HLC). None of the trap catches correlated with HLC in the number of An. aquasalis captured over time. The high efficiency of the HLC method indicates that this malaria vector was anthropophilic at this site, especially as carbon dioxide was insufficiently attractive as stand-alone bait. Traps using carbon dioxide in combination with human odorants may provide better results.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-364
JournalMemorias Do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
Volume106
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Keywords

  • light traps
  • malaria vectors
  • mosquitos
  • culicidae
  • diptera
  • tanzania
  • 1-octen-3-ol
  • gambiae
  • attractiveness
  • surveillance

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Carbon dioxide baited trap catches do not correlate with human landing collections of Anopheles aquasalis in Suriname'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this