Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities

R.W. Kays, B. Kranstauber, P.A. Jansen, C. Carbone, M. Rowcliffe, T. Fountain, S. Tilak

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademicpeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studying animal movement and distribution is of critical importance to addressing environmental challenges including invasive species, infectious diseases, climate and land-use change. Motion sensitive camera traps offer a visual sensor to record the presence of a species at a location, recording their movement in the Eulerian sense. Modern digital camera traps that record video present new analytical opportunities, but also new data management challenges. This paper describes our experience with a year-long terrestrial animal monitoring system at Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The data gathered from our camera network shows the spatio-temporal dynamics of terrestrial bird and mammal activity at the site-data relevant to immediate science questions, and long-term conservation issues. We believe that the experience gained and lessons learned during our year long deployment and testing of the camera traps are applicable to broader sensor network applications and are valuable for the advancement of the sensor network research. We suggest that the continued development of these hardware, software, and analytical tools, in concert, offer an exciting sensor-network solution to monitoring of animal populations which could realistically scale over larger areas and time spans
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland, 20-23 October 2009
Pages811-818
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland -
Duration: 20 Oct 200923 Oct 2009

Workshop

Workshop4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland
Period20/10/0923/10/09

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animal community
sensor
monitoring
animal
data management
infectious disease
invasive species
monitoring system
hardware
land use change
mammal
bird
software
climate

Cite this

Kays, R. W., Kranstauber, B., Jansen, P. A., Carbone, C., Rowcliffe, M., Fountain, T., & Tilak, S. (2009). Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities. In Proceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland, 20-23 October 2009 (pp. 811-818) https://doi.org/10.1109/LCN.2009.5355046
Kays, R.W. ; Kranstauber, B. ; Jansen, P.A. ; Carbone, C. ; Rowcliffe, M. ; Fountain, T. ; Tilak, S. / Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities. Proceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland, 20-23 October 2009. 2009. pp. 811-818
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title = "Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities",
abstract = "Studying animal movement and distribution is of critical importance to addressing environmental challenges including invasive species, infectious diseases, climate and land-use change. Motion sensitive camera traps offer a visual sensor to record the presence of a species at a location, recording their movement in the Eulerian sense. Modern digital camera traps that record video present new analytical opportunities, but also new data management challenges. This paper describes our experience with a year-long terrestrial animal monitoring system at Barro Colorado Island, Panama. The data gathered from our camera network shows the spatio-temporal dynamics of terrestrial bird and mammal activity at the site-data relevant to immediate science questions, and long-term conservation issues. We believe that the experience gained and lessons learned during our year long deployment and testing of the camera traps are applicable to broader sensor network applications and are valuable for the advancement of the sensor network research. We suggest that the continued development of these hardware, software, and analytical tools, in concert, offer an exciting sensor-network solution to monitoring of animal populations which could realistically scale over larger areas and time spans",
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Kays, RW, Kranstauber, B, Jansen, PA, Carbone, C, Rowcliffe, M, Fountain, T & Tilak, S 2009, Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities. in Proceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland, 20-23 October 2009. pp. 811-818, 4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland, 20/10/09. https://doi.org/10.1109/LCN.2009.5355046

Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities. / Kays, R.W.; Kranstauber, B.; Jansen, P.A.; Carbone, C.; Rowcliffe, M.; Fountain, T.; Tilak, S.

Proceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland, 20-23 October 2009. 2009. p. 811-818.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademicpeer-review

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Kays RW, Kranstauber B, Jansen PA, Carbone C, Rowcliffe M, Fountain T et al. Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities. In Proceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Practical Issues in Building Sensor Network Applications (SenseApp) and the IEEE 34th Conference on Local Computer Networks (LCN 2009), Zurich, Switzerland, 20-23 October 2009. 2009. p. 811-818 https://doi.org/10.1109/LCN.2009.5355046