Calcium mineralization in the forest floor and surface soil beneath different tree species in the northeastern US

F.A. Dijkstra

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    52 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Calcium (Ca) is an important element for neutralizing soil acidity in temperate forests. The immediate availability of Ca in forested acid soils is largely dependent on mineralization of organic Ca, which may differ significantly among tree species. I estimated net Ca mineralization in the forest floor and upper 15cm of mineral soil beneath six tree species in a mixed-species forest in northwestern Connecticut, using the buried bag method. Net Ca mineralization in the forest floor was significantly correlated with mass loss of the decomposing forest floor litter. Higher mass loss fractions during the summer and in forest floors beneath sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and white ash (Fraxinus americana) coincided with higher net Ca mineralization rates. More Ca was released per unit mass loss of forest floor beneath sugar maple and white ash (362 and 390mmolkg-1, respectively) than beneath American beech (Fagus grandifolia), red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) (183, 133, 147, and 190mmolkg-1, respectively). Due to the high forest floor mass beneath red maple, beech, red oak, and hemlock, net Ca mineralization in the forest floor per unit area beneath these tree species did not differ significantly from sugar maple and white ash (ranging between 80mmolm-2 per year for beech and 141mmolm-2 per year for sugar maple). Net Ca mineralization in the mineral soil was significantly larger beneath sugar maple (142mmolm-2 per year) than beneath the other tree species (ranging between -10mmolm-2 per year for beech and 55mmolm-2 per year for white ash). These results show that Ca mineralization rates are large and differ significantly among tree species, affecting the spatial pattern of soil acidity and Ca availability in a mixed-species forest stand.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)185-194
    JournalForest Ecology and Management
    Volume175
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Fingerprint

    forest floor
    forest litter
    mineralization
    soil surface
    calcium
    Fraxinus americana
    Acer saccharum subsp. saccharum
    soil
    sugar
    Acer rubrum
    ash
    Fagus
    Fagus grandifolia
    mineral soils
    acidity
    soil pH
    Quercus
    Tsuga canadensis
    Quercus rubra
    Acer saccharum

    Keywords

    • litter decomposition
    • nutrient release
    • hubbard brook
    • leaf litter
    • mass-loss
    • nitrogen
    • chemistry
    • nutrition
    • dynamics
    • wisconsin

    Cite this

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    title = "Calcium mineralization in the forest floor and surface soil beneath different tree species in the northeastern US",
    abstract = "Calcium (Ca) is an important element for neutralizing soil acidity in temperate forests. The immediate availability of Ca in forested acid soils is largely dependent on mineralization of organic Ca, which may differ significantly among tree species. I estimated net Ca mineralization in the forest floor and upper 15cm of mineral soil beneath six tree species in a mixed-species forest in northwestern Connecticut, using the buried bag method. Net Ca mineralization in the forest floor was significantly correlated with mass loss of the decomposing forest floor litter. Higher mass loss fractions during the summer and in forest floors beneath sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and white ash (Fraxinus americana) coincided with higher net Ca mineralization rates. More Ca was released per unit mass loss of forest floor beneath sugar maple and white ash (362 and 390mmolkg-1, respectively) than beneath American beech (Fagus grandifolia), red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) (183, 133, 147, and 190mmolkg-1, respectively). Due to the high forest floor mass beneath red maple, beech, red oak, and hemlock, net Ca mineralization in the forest floor per unit area beneath these tree species did not differ significantly from sugar maple and white ash (ranging between 80mmolm-2 per year for beech and 141mmolm-2 per year for sugar maple). Net Ca mineralization in the mineral soil was significantly larger beneath sugar maple (142mmolm-2 per year) than beneath the other tree species (ranging between -10mmolm-2 per year for beech and 55mmolm-2 per year for white ash). These results show that Ca mineralization rates are large and differ significantly among tree species, affecting the spatial pattern of soil acidity and Ca availability in a mixed-species forest stand.",
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    language = "English",
    volume = "175",
    pages = "185--194",
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    Calcium mineralization in the forest floor and surface soil beneath different tree species in the northeastern US. / Dijkstra, F.A.

    In: Forest Ecology and Management, Vol. 175, No. 1, 2003, p. 185-194.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Calcium mineralization in the forest floor and surface soil beneath different tree species in the northeastern US

    AU - Dijkstra, F.A.

    N1 - 000181504000013

    PY - 2003

    Y1 - 2003

    N2 - Calcium (Ca) is an important element for neutralizing soil acidity in temperate forests. The immediate availability of Ca in forested acid soils is largely dependent on mineralization of organic Ca, which may differ significantly among tree species. I estimated net Ca mineralization in the forest floor and upper 15cm of mineral soil beneath six tree species in a mixed-species forest in northwestern Connecticut, using the buried bag method. Net Ca mineralization in the forest floor was significantly correlated with mass loss of the decomposing forest floor litter. Higher mass loss fractions during the summer and in forest floors beneath sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and white ash (Fraxinus americana) coincided with higher net Ca mineralization rates. More Ca was released per unit mass loss of forest floor beneath sugar maple and white ash (362 and 390mmolkg-1, respectively) than beneath American beech (Fagus grandifolia), red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) (183, 133, 147, and 190mmolkg-1, respectively). Due to the high forest floor mass beneath red maple, beech, red oak, and hemlock, net Ca mineralization in the forest floor per unit area beneath these tree species did not differ significantly from sugar maple and white ash (ranging between 80mmolm-2 per year for beech and 141mmolm-2 per year for sugar maple). Net Ca mineralization in the mineral soil was significantly larger beneath sugar maple (142mmolm-2 per year) than beneath the other tree species (ranging between -10mmolm-2 per year for beech and 55mmolm-2 per year for white ash). These results show that Ca mineralization rates are large and differ significantly among tree species, affecting the spatial pattern of soil acidity and Ca availability in a mixed-species forest stand.

    AB - Calcium (Ca) is an important element for neutralizing soil acidity in temperate forests. The immediate availability of Ca in forested acid soils is largely dependent on mineralization of organic Ca, which may differ significantly among tree species. I estimated net Ca mineralization in the forest floor and upper 15cm of mineral soil beneath six tree species in a mixed-species forest in northwestern Connecticut, using the buried bag method. Net Ca mineralization in the forest floor was significantly correlated with mass loss of the decomposing forest floor litter. Higher mass loss fractions during the summer and in forest floors beneath sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and white ash (Fraxinus americana) coincided with higher net Ca mineralization rates. More Ca was released per unit mass loss of forest floor beneath sugar maple and white ash (362 and 390mmolkg-1, respectively) than beneath American beech (Fagus grandifolia), red maple (Acer rubrum), red oak (Quercus rubra) and hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) (183, 133, 147, and 190mmolkg-1, respectively). Due to the high forest floor mass beneath red maple, beech, red oak, and hemlock, net Ca mineralization in the forest floor per unit area beneath these tree species did not differ significantly from sugar maple and white ash (ranging between 80mmolm-2 per year for beech and 141mmolm-2 per year for sugar maple). Net Ca mineralization in the mineral soil was significantly larger beneath sugar maple (142mmolm-2 per year) than beneath the other tree species (ranging between -10mmolm-2 per year for beech and 55mmolm-2 per year for white ash). These results show that Ca mineralization rates are large and differ significantly among tree species, affecting the spatial pattern of soil acidity and Ca availability in a mixed-species forest stand.

    KW - litter decomposition

    KW - nutrient release

    KW - hubbard brook

    KW - leaf litter

    KW - mass-loss

    KW - nitrogen

    KW - chemistry

    KW - nutrition

    KW - dynamics

    KW - wisconsin

    U2 - 10.1016/S0378-1127(02)00128-7

    DO - 10.1016/S0378-1127(02)00128-7

    M3 - Article

    VL - 175

    SP - 185

    EP - 194

    JO - Forest Ecology and Management

    JF - Forest Ecology and Management

    SN - 0378-1127

    IS - 1

    ER -