Bud abortion in tulip bulbs studied by magnetic resonance imaging

M.G. van Kilsdonk, K. Nicolay, J.M. Franssen, C. Kolloffel

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    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    After storage and subsequent planting of flower bulbs, the flower bud frequently appears to be aborted. This physiological aberration is probably caused by a change in the water status of the bulb and may be initiated during storage. The development of bud abortion in tulip bulbs was studied during long-term dry storage of the bulbs at 5 °C. The anatomy of individual tulip bulbs was followed non-invasively with T2-weighted NMR imaging, which allowed the monitoring of the growth of the shoot and daughter bulbs. Quantitative maps of T1 and T2 relaxation times of individual bulbs were used to assess regional changes in the water status of different tissues. Parallel to the NMR measurements, bulbs were planted to assess the ultimate flower quality. Moreover, water content, osmolality of tissue sap and ion leakage of excised shoot and scale tissues were determined to obtain information about the water status and viability of the bulbs. Significant decreases during long-term storage were found in T1 and T2 relaxation times in the shoot and particularly in the stamens. An increase in the osmolality of tissue sap and the decrease in relaxation times in the shoot below a certain threshold value attained after 24 weeks of storage, could be indicative for the emergence of bud abortion in tulips
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1603-1611
    JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
    Volume53
    Issue number374
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2002

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