Brief self-efficacy interventions to increase healthy dietary behaviours: evidence from two randomized controlled trials

Emily P. Bouwman*, Marleen C. Onwezen, Danny Taufik, David de Buisonjé, Amber Ronteltap

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Self-efficacy has often been found to play a significant role in healthy dietary behaviours. However, self-efficacy interventions most often consist of intensive interventions. The authors aim to provide more insight into the effect of brief self-efficacy interventions on healthy dietary behaviours. Design/methodology/approach: In the present article, two randomized controlled trials are described. In study 1, a brief self-efficacy intervention with multiple self-efficacy techniques integrated on a flyer is tested, and in study 2, an online brief self-efficacy intervention with a single self-efficacy technique is tested. Findings: The results show that a brief self-efficacy intervention can directly increase vegetable intake and indirectly improve compliance to a diet plan to eat healthier. Originality/value: These findings suggest that self-efficacy interventions do not always have to be intensive to change dietary behaviours and that brief self-efficacy interventions can also lead to more healthy dietary behaviours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3297-3311
JournalBritish Food Journal
Volume122
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Brief intervention
  • Fruit and vegetable intake
  • Healthy dietary behaviour
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Self-efficacy

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