Brain response to images of food varying in energy density is associated with body composition in 7- to 10-year-old children: Results of an exploratory study

S.N. Fearnbach, Laural K. English, Marlou Lasschuijt, Stephen J. Wilson, Jennifer S. Savage, Jennifer O. Fisher, Barbara J. Rolls, Kathleen L. Keller*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Energy balance is regulated by a multifaceted system of physiological signals that influence energy intake and expenditure. Therefore, variability in the brain's response to food may be partially explained by differences in levels of metabolically active tissues throughout the body, including fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that children's body composition would be related to their brain response to food images varying in energy density (ED), a measure of energy content per weight of food. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure brain response to High (> 1.5 kcal/g) and Low (

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-9
Number of pages7
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume162
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Children
  • Energy density
  • Fat-free mass
  • fMRI
  • Neuroimaging

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