Biorefinery of microalgal soluble proteins by sequential processing and membrane filtration

C. Safi*, G. Olivieri, Rui Pina Campos, N. Engelen-Smit, W.J. Mulder, L.A.M. van den Broek, L. Sijtsma

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A mild biorefinery process was investigated on the microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana, to obtain an enriched fraction of water soluble proteins free from chlorophyll. After harvesting, a 100 g.L−1 solution of cells was first subjected to cell disruption by either high-pressure homogenization (HPH) or enzymatic treatment (ENZ). HPH resulted in a larger release of proteins (49%) in the aqueous phase compared to the Alcalase incubation (35%). In both cases, an ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF) was then performed on the supernatant obtained from cell disruption by testing different membrane cut-off (1000 kDa, 500 kDa and 300 kDa). After optimising the process conditions, the combination of ENZ → UF/DF ended in a larger overall yield of water soluble proteins (24.8%) in the permeate compared to the combination of HPH → UF/DF (17.4%). A gel polarization model was implemented to assess the maximum achievable concentration factor during ultrafiltration and the mass transfer coefficient related to the theoretical permeation flux rate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-158
JournalBioresource Technology
Volume225
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Ultrafiltration
ultrafiltration
membrane
Proteins
Membranes
protein
Processing
Subtilisins
microalga
Water
Chlorophyll
Permeation
mass transfer
chlorophyll
Mass transfer
Gels
polarization
gel
incubation
Polarization

Keywords

  • Biorefinery
  • Cell disruption
  • Fractionation
  • Proteins
  • Ultrafiltration

Cite this

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title = "Biorefinery of microalgal soluble proteins by sequential processing and membrane filtration",
abstract = "A mild biorefinery process was investigated on the microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana, to obtain an enriched fraction of water soluble proteins free from chlorophyll. After harvesting, a 100 g.L−1 solution of cells was first subjected to cell disruption by either high-pressure homogenization (HPH) or enzymatic treatment (ENZ). HPH resulted in a larger release of proteins (49{\%}) in the aqueous phase compared to the Alcalase incubation (35{\%}). In both cases, an ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF) was then performed on the supernatant obtained from cell disruption by testing different membrane cut-off (1000 kDa, 500 kDa and 300 kDa). After optimising the process conditions, the combination of ENZ → UF/DF ended in a larger overall yield of water soluble proteins (24.8{\%}) in the permeate compared to the combination of HPH → UF/DF (17.4{\%}). A gel polarization model was implemented to assess the maximum achievable concentration factor during ultrafiltration and the mass transfer coefficient related to the theoretical permeation flux rate.",
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author = "C. Safi and G. Olivieri and {Pina Campos}, Rui and N. Engelen-Smit and W.J. Mulder and {van den Broek}, L.A.M. and L. Sijtsma",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.biortech.2016.11.068",
language = "English",
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journal = "Bioresource Technology",
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Biorefinery of microalgal soluble proteins by sequential processing and membrane filtration. / Safi, C.; Olivieri, G.; Pina Campos, Rui; Engelen-Smit, N.; Mulder, W.J.; van den Broek, L.A.M.; Sijtsma, L.

In: Bioresource Technology, Vol. 225, 2017, p. 151-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biorefinery of microalgal soluble proteins by sequential processing and membrane filtration

AU - Safi, C.

AU - Olivieri, G.

AU - Pina Campos, Rui

AU - Engelen-Smit, N.

AU - Mulder, W.J.

AU - van den Broek, L.A.M.

AU - Sijtsma, L.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - A mild biorefinery process was investigated on the microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana, to obtain an enriched fraction of water soluble proteins free from chlorophyll. After harvesting, a 100 g.L−1 solution of cells was first subjected to cell disruption by either high-pressure homogenization (HPH) or enzymatic treatment (ENZ). HPH resulted in a larger release of proteins (49%) in the aqueous phase compared to the Alcalase incubation (35%). In both cases, an ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF) was then performed on the supernatant obtained from cell disruption by testing different membrane cut-off (1000 kDa, 500 kDa and 300 kDa). After optimising the process conditions, the combination of ENZ → UF/DF ended in a larger overall yield of water soluble proteins (24.8%) in the permeate compared to the combination of HPH → UF/DF (17.4%). A gel polarization model was implemented to assess the maximum achievable concentration factor during ultrafiltration and the mass transfer coefficient related to the theoretical permeation flux rate.

AB - A mild biorefinery process was investigated on the microalga Nannochloropsis gaditana, to obtain an enriched fraction of water soluble proteins free from chlorophyll. After harvesting, a 100 g.L−1 solution of cells was first subjected to cell disruption by either high-pressure homogenization (HPH) or enzymatic treatment (ENZ). HPH resulted in a larger release of proteins (49%) in the aqueous phase compared to the Alcalase incubation (35%). In both cases, an ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF) was then performed on the supernatant obtained from cell disruption by testing different membrane cut-off (1000 kDa, 500 kDa and 300 kDa). After optimising the process conditions, the combination of ENZ → UF/DF ended in a larger overall yield of water soluble proteins (24.8%) in the permeate compared to the combination of HPH → UF/DF (17.4%). A gel polarization model was implemented to assess the maximum achievable concentration factor during ultrafiltration and the mass transfer coefficient related to the theoretical permeation flux rate.

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KW - Ultrafiltration

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