Biologically enhanced hydrogen sulfide absorption from sour gas under haloalkaline conditions

Rieks de Rink, Johannes B.M. Klok, Gijs J. van Heeringen, Karel J. Keesman, Albert J.H. Janssen, Annemiek ter Heijne*, Cees J.N. Buisman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We studied a biotechnological desulfurization process for removal of toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour gas. The process consists of two steps: i) Selective absorption of H2S into a (bi)carbonate solution in the absorber column and ii) conversion of sulfide to sulfur by sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the aerated bioreactor. In previous studies, several physico-chemical factors were assessed to explain the observed enhancement of H2S absorption in the absorber, but a full explanation was not provided. We investigated the relation between the metabolic activity of SOB and the enhancement factor. Two continuous experiments on pilot-scale were performed to determine H2S absorption efficiencies at different temperatures and biomass concentrations. The absorption efficiency improved at increasing temperatures, i.e. H2S concentration in the treated gas decreased from 715 ± 265 ppmv at 25.4 °C to 69 ± 25 ppmv at 39.4 °C. The opposite trend is expected when H2S absorption is solely determined by physico-chemical factors. Furthermore, increasing biomass concentrations to the absorber also resulted in decreased H2S concentrations in the treated gas, from approximately 6000 ppmv without biomass to 1664 ± 126 ppmv at 44 mg N/L. From our studies it can be concluded that SOB activity enhances H2S absorption and leads to increased H2S removal efficiencies in biotechnological gas desulfurization.

Original languageEnglish
Article number121104
JournalJournal of Hazardous Materials
Volume383
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Feb 2020

Fingerprint

Sour gas
Hydrogen Sulfide
Hydrogen sulfide
Sulfides
hydrogen sulfide
Gases
sulfide
absorption efficiency
Bacteria
Biomass
Desulfurization
gas
bacterium
biomass
Poisons
Carbonates
Bioreactors
Sulfur
bioreactor
Temperature

Keywords

  • Biological enhancement factor
  • Gas desulfurization
  • HS absorption
  • Sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB)

Cite this

@article{71acaf52e85940f393a42ab18057593e,
title = "Biologically enhanced hydrogen sulfide absorption from sour gas under haloalkaline conditions",
abstract = "We studied a biotechnological desulfurization process for removal of toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour gas. The process consists of two steps: i) Selective absorption of H2S into a (bi)carbonate solution in the absorber column and ii) conversion of sulfide to sulfur by sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the aerated bioreactor. In previous studies, several physico-chemical factors were assessed to explain the observed enhancement of H2S absorption in the absorber, but a full explanation was not provided. We investigated the relation between the metabolic activity of SOB and the enhancement factor. Two continuous experiments on pilot-scale were performed to determine H2S absorption efficiencies at different temperatures and biomass concentrations. The absorption efficiency improved at increasing temperatures, i.e. H2S concentration in the treated gas decreased from 715 ± 265 ppmv at 25.4 °C to 69 ± 25 ppmv at 39.4 °C. The opposite trend is expected when H2S absorption is solely determined by physico-chemical factors. Furthermore, increasing biomass concentrations to the absorber also resulted in decreased H2S concentrations in the treated gas, from approximately 6000 ppmv without biomass to 1664 ± 126 ppmv at 44 mg N/L. From our studies it can be concluded that SOB activity enhances H2S absorption and leads to increased H2S removal efficiencies in biotechnological gas desulfurization.",
keywords = "Biological enhancement factor, Gas desulfurization, HS absorption, Sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB)",
author = "{de Rink}, Rieks and Klok, {Johannes B.M.} and {van Heeringen}, {Gijs J.} and Keesman, {Karel J.} and Janssen, {Albert J.H.} and {ter Heijne}, Annemiek and Buisman, {Cees J.N.}",
year = "2020",
month = "2",
day = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.121104",
language = "English",
volume = "383",
journal = "Journal of Hazardous Materials",
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Biologically enhanced hydrogen sulfide absorption from sour gas under haloalkaline conditions. / de Rink, Rieks; Klok, Johannes B.M.; van Heeringen, Gijs J.; Keesman, Karel J.; Janssen, Albert J.H.; ter Heijne, Annemiek; Buisman, Cees J.N.

In: Journal of Hazardous Materials, Vol. 383, 121104, 05.02.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Biologically enhanced hydrogen sulfide absorption from sour gas under haloalkaline conditions

AU - de Rink, Rieks

AU - Klok, Johannes B.M.

AU - van Heeringen, Gijs J.

AU - Keesman, Karel J.

AU - Janssen, Albert J.H.

AU - ter Heijne, Annemiek

AU - Buisman, Cees J.N.

PY - 2020/2/5

Y1 - 2020/2/5

N2 - We studied a biotechnological desulfurization process for removal of toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour gas. The process consists of two steps: i) Selective absorption of H2S into a (bi)carbonate solution in the absorber column and ii) conversion of sulfide to sulfur by sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the aerated bioreactor. In previous studies, several physico-chemical factors were assessed to explain the observed enhancement of H2S absorption in the absorber, but a full explanation was not provided. We investigated the relation between the metabolic activity of SOB and the enhancement factor. Two continuous experiments on pilot-scale were performed to determine H2S absorption efficiencies at different temperatures and biomass concentrations. The absorption efficiency improved at increasing temperatures, i.e. H2S concentration in the treated gas decreased from 715 ± 265 ppmv at 25.4 °C to 69 ± 25 ppmv at 39.4 °C. The opposite trend is expected when H2S absorption is solely determined by physico-chemical factors. Furthermore, increasing biomass concentrations to the absorber also resulted in decreased H2S concentrations in the treated gas, from approximately 6000 ppmv without biomass to 1664 ± 126 ppmv at 44 mg N/L. From our studies it can be concluded that SOB activity enhances H2S absorption and leads to increased H2S removal efficiencies in biotechnological gas desulfurization.

AB - We studied a biotechnological desulfurization process for removal of toxic hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from sour gas. The process consists of two steps: i) Selective absorption of H2S into a (bi)carbonate solution in the absorber column and ii) conversion of sulfide to sulfur by sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in the aerated bioreactor. In previous studies, several physico-chemical factors were assessed to explain the observed enhancement of H2S absorption in the absorber, but a full explanation was not provided. We investigated the relation between the metabolic activity of SOB and the enhancement factor. Two continuous experiments on pilot-scale were performed to determine H2S absorption efficiencies at different temperatures and biomass concentrations. The absorption efficiency improved at increasing temperatures, i.e. H2S concentration in the treated gas decreased from 715 ± 265 ppmv at 25.4 °C to 69 ± 25 ppmv at 39.4 °C. The opposite trend is expected when H2S absorption is solely determined by physico-chemical factors. Furthermore, increasing biomass concentrations to the absorber also resulted in decreased H2S concentrations in the treated gas, from approximately 6000 ppmv without biomass to 1664 ± 126 ppmv at 44 mg N/L. From our studies it can be concluded that SOB activity enhances H2S absorption and leads to increased H2S removal efficiencies in biotechnological gas desulfurization.

KW - Biological enhancement factor

KW - Gas desulfurization

KW - HS absorption

KW - Sulfide oxidizing bacteria (SOB)

U2 - 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.121104

DO - 10.1016/j.jhazmat.2019.121104

M3 - Article

VL - 383

JO - Journal of Hazardous Materials

JF - Journal of Hazardous Materials

SN - 0304-3894

M1 - 121104

ER -