Benefits and costs of biologically contained genetically modified tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM) crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringent than for crops without biological containment. The potential adoption of biologically contained GM tomatoes and eggplants is assessed in a cost-benefit framework for Italy and Spain. We conclude that biological containment has considerable potential benefits if policy makers are willing to loosen the restrictions on the introduction of these varieties
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1265-1281
JournalSustainability
Volume3
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Crops
Italy
Spain
crop
costs
coexistence
cost
Costs
containment
regulation
introgression
safety

Cite this

@article{aab6753314b5491fa4fe4956d6b3f3a5,
title = "Benefits and costs of biologically contained genetically modified tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain",
abstract = "In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM) crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringent than for crops without biological containment. The potential adoption of biologically contained GM tomatoes and eggplants is assessed in a cost-benefit framework for Italy and Spain. We conclude that biological containment has considerable potential benefits if policy makers are willing to loosen the restrictions on the introduction of these varieties",
author = "R.A. Groeneveld and E. Ansink and {van de Wiel}, C.C.M. and J.H.H. Wesseler",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.3390/su3081265",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "1265--1281",
journal = "Sustainability",
issn = "2071-1050",
publisher = "MDPI",
number = "8",

}

Benefits and costs of biologically contained genetically modified tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. / Groeneveld, R.A.; Ansink, E.; van de Wiel, C.C.M.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

In: Sustainability, Vol. 3, No. 8, 2011, p. 1265-1281.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Benefits and costs of biologically contained genetically modified tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain

AU - Groeneveld, R.A.

AU - Ansink, E.

AU - van de Wiel, C.C.M.

AU - Wesseler, J.H.H.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM) crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringent than for crops without biological containment. The potential adoption of biologically contained GM tomatoes and eggplants is assessed in a cost-benefit framework for Italy and Spain. We conclude that biological containment has considerable potential benefits if policy makers are willing to loosen the restrictions on the introduction of these varieties

AB - In this paper we assess the benefits and costs of introducing biologically contained genetically modified (GM) crops, with an application to the potential introduction of GM tomatoes and eggplants in Italy and Spain. Such crops possess both the standard beneficial GM traits, and they prevent introgression of transgenes from GM crops to their conventional or wild relatives, thereby adding to the safety of their cultivation. As a result, coexistence regulations for these crops are less stringent than for crops without biological containment. The potential adoption of biologically contained GM tomatoes and eggplants is assessed in a cost-benefit framework for Italy and Spain. We conclude that biological containment has considerable potential benefits if policy makers are willing to loosen the restrictions on the introduction of these varieties

U2 - 10.3390/su3081265

DO - 10.3390/su3081265

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 1265

EP - 1281

JO - Sustainability

JF - Sustainability

SN - 2071-1050

IS - 8

ER -