Bacterial concentration and diversity in fresh tropical shrimps (Penaeus notialis) and the surrounding brackish waters and sediment

S. Dabade, J.C.M. Wolkers-Rooijackers, P. Azokpota, D.J. Hounhouigan, M.H. Zwietering, R. Nout, H.M.W. den Besten*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed at determining bacterial concentration and diversity in fresh tropical shrimps (. Penaeus notialis) and their surrounding brackish waters and sediment. Freshly caught shrimp, water and sediment samples were collected in Lakes Nokoue and Aheme in Benin (West Africa) during two periods with different water salinity and temperature. We used complementary culture-dependent and culture-independent methods for microbiota analysis. During both sampling periods, total mesophilic aerobic counts in shrimp samples ranged between 4.4 and 5.9 log CFU/g and were significantly higher than in water or sediment samples. In contrast, bacterial diversity was higher in sediment or water than in shrimps. The dominant phyla were Firmicutes and Proteobacteria in shrimps, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria in water, and Proteobacteria and Chloroflexi in sediment. At species level, distinct bacterial communities were associated with sediment, water and shrimps sampled at the same site the same day. The study suggests that the bacterial community of tropical brackish water shrimps cannot be predicted from the microbiota of their aquatic environment. Thus, monitoring of microbiological quality of aquatic environments might not reflect shrimp microbiological quality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)96-104
JournalInternational Journal of Food Microbiology
Volume218
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Clone libraries analysis
  • Invertebrates microbiota
  • PCR-DGGE
  • Tropical fishery products

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