B-vitamins and body composition: integrating observational and experimental evidence from the B-PROOF study

Sadaf Oliai Araghi, Kim V.E. Braun, Nathalie van der Velde, Suzanne C. van Dijk, Natasja M. van Schoor, M.C. Zillikens, Lisette C.P.G.M. de Groot, Andre G. Uitterlinden, Bruno H. Stricker, Trudy Voortman, Jessica C. Kiefte-de Jong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Higher folate and vitamin-B12 have been linked to lower risk of overweight. However, whether this is a causal effect of these B-vitamins on obesity risk remains unclear and evidence in older individuals is scarce. This study aimed to assess the role of B-vitamin supplementation and levels on body composition in older individuals. Methods: A double-blind, randomized controlled trial in 2919 participants aged ≥ 65 years with elevated homocysteine levels. The intervention comprised a 2-year supplementation with a combination of folic acid (400 µg) and vitamin B12 (500 µg), or with placebo. Serum folate, vitamin-B12, active vitamin-B12 (HoloTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and anthropometrics were measured at baseline and after 2 years of follow-up. Dietary intake of folate and vitamin-B12 was measured at baseline in a subsample (n = 603) using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) were assessed with Dual Energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Cross-sectional analyses showed that a 1 nmol/L higher serum folate was associated with a 0.021 kg/m 2 lower BMI (95% CI − 0.039; − 0.004). Higher HoloTC (per pmol/L log-transformed) was associated with a 0.955 kg/m 2 higher FMI (95% CI 0.262; 1.647), and higher MMA (per μgmol/L) was associated with a 1.108 kg/m 2 lower FMI (95% CI − 1.899; − 0.316). However, random allocation of B-vitamins did not have a significant effect on changes in BMI, FMI or FFMI during 2 years of intervention. Conclusions: Although observational data suggested that folate and vitamin B12 status are associated with body composition, random allocation of a supplement with both B-vitamins combined versus placebo did not confirm an effect on BMI or body composition.

LanguageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 May 2019

Fingerprint

Vitamin B Complex
Vitamin B 12
Body Composition
Folic Acid
Fats
Methylmalonic Acid
Random Allocation
Placebos
Photon Absorptiometry
Homocysteine
Serum
Double-Blind Method
Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Food

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Body composition
  • Effect of vitamin B12 and folic acid on obesity
  • Fat (Free) mass
  • Vitamin B12 and folic acid

Cite this

Oliai Araghi, S., Braun, K. V. E., van der Velde, N., van Dijk, S. C., van Schoor, N. M., Zillikens, M. C., ... Kiefte-de Jong, J. C. (2019). B-vitamins and body composition: integrating observational and experimental evidence from the B-PROOF study. European Journal of Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-01985-8
Oliai Araghi, Sadaf ; Braun, Kim V.E. ; van der Velde, Nathalie ; van Dijk, Suzanne C. ; van Schoor, Natasja M. ; Zillikens, M.C. ; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. ; Uitterlinden, Andre G. ; Stricker, Bruno H. ; Voortman, Trudy ; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C. / B-vitamins and body composition: integrating observational and experimental evidence from the B-PROOF study. In: European Journal of Nutrition. 2019.
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abstract = "Purpose: Higher folate and vitamin-B12 have been linked to lower risk of overweight. However, whether this is a causal effect of these B-vitamins on obesity risk remains unclear and evidence in older individuals is scarce. This study aimed to assess the role of B-vitamin supplementation and levels on body composition in older individuals. Methods: A double-blind, randomized controlled trial in 2919 participants aged ≥ 65 years with elevated homocysteine levels. The intervention comprised a 2-year supplementation with a combination of folic acid (400 µg) and vitamin B12 (500 µg), or with placebo. Serum folate, vitamin-B12, active vitamin-B12 (HoloTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and anthropometrics were measured at baseline and after 2 years of follow-up. Dietary intake of folate and vitamin-B12 was measured at baseline in a subsample (n = 603) using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) were assessed with Dual Energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Cross-sectional analyses showed that a 1 nmol/L higher serum folate was associated with a 0.021 kg/m 2 lower BMI (95{\%} CI − 0.039; − 0.004). Higher HoloTC (per pmol/L log-transformed) was associated with a 0.955 kg/m 2 higher FMI (95{\%} CI 0.262; 1.647), and higher MMA (per μgmol/L) was associated with a 1.108 kg/m 2 lower FMI (95{\%} CI − 1.899; − 0.316). However, random allocation of B-vitamins did not have a significant effect on changes in BMI, FMI or FFMI during 2 years of intervention. Conclusions: Although observational data suggested that folate and vitamin B12 status are associated with body composition, random allocation of a supplement with both B-vitamins combined versus placebo did not confirm an effect on BMI or body composition.",
keywords = "BMI, Body composition, Effect of vitamin B12 and folic acid on obesity, Fat (Free) mass, Vitamin B12 and folic acid",
author = "{Oliai Araghi}, Sadaf and Braun, {Kim V.E.} and {van der Velde}, Nathalie and {van Dijk}, {Suzanne C.} and {van Schoor}, {Natasja M.} and M.C. Zillikens and {de Groot}, {Lisette C.P.G.M.} and Uitterlinden, {Andre G.} and Stricker, {Bruno H.} and Trudy Voortman and {Kiefte-de Jong}, {Jessica C.}",
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Oliai Araghi, S, Braun, KVE, van der Velde, N, van Dijk, SC, van Schoor, NM, Zillikens, MC, de Groot, LCPGM, Uitterlinden, AG, Stricker, BH, Voortman, T & Kiefte-de Jong, JC 2019, 'B-vitamins and body composition: integrating observational and experimental evidence from the B-PROOF study', European Journal of Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00394-019-01985-8

B-vitamins and body composition: integrating observational and experimental evidence from the B-PROOF study. / Oliai Araghi, Sadaf; Braun, Kim V.E.; van der Velde, Nathalie; van Dijk, Suzanne C.; van Schoor, Natasja M.; Zillikens, M.C.; de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Voortman, Trudy; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.

In: European Journal of Nutrition, 10.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - B-vitamins and body composition: integrating observational and experimental evidence from the B-PROOF study

AU - Oliai Araghi, Sadaf

AU - Braun, Kim V.E.

AU - van der Velde, Nathalie

AU - van Dijk, Suzanne C.

AU - van Schoor, Natasja M.

AU - Zillikens, M.C.

AU - de Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M.

AU - Uitterlinden, Andre G.

AU - Stricker, Bruno H.

AU - Voortman, Trudy

AU - Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C.

PY - 2019/5/10

Y1 - 2019/5/10

N2 - Purpose: Higher folate and vitamin-B12 have been linked to lower risk of overweight. However, whether this is a causal effect of these B-vitamins on obesity risk remains unclear and evidence in older individuals is scarce. This study aimed to assess the role of B-vitamin supplementation and levels on body composition in older individuals. Methods: A double-blind, randomized controlled trial in 2919 participants aged ≥ 65 years with elevated homocysteine levels. The intervention comprised a 2-year supplementation with a combination of folic acid (400 µg) and vitamin B12 (500 µg), or with placebo. Serum folate, vitamin-B12, active vitamin-B12 (HoloTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and anthropometrics were measured at baseline and after 2 years of follow-up. Dietary intake of folate and vitamin-B12 was measured at baseline in a subsample (n = 603) using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) were assessed with Dual Energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Cross-sectional analyses showed that a 1 nmol/L higher serum folate was associated with a 0.021 kg/m 2 lower BMI (95% CI − 0.039; − 0.004). Higher HoloTC (per pmol/L log-transformed) was associated with a 0.955 kg/m 2 higher FMI (95% CI 0.262; 1.647), and higher MMA (per μgmol/L) was associated with a 1.108 kg/m 2 lower FMI (95% CI − 1.899; − 0.316). However, random allocation of B-vitamins did not have a significant effect on changes in BMI, FMI or FFMI during 2 years of intervention. Conclusions: Although observational data suggested that folate and vitamin B12 status are associated with body composition, random allocation of a supplement with both B-vitamins combined versus placebo did not confirm an effect on BMI or body composition.

AB - Purpose: Higher folate and vitamin-B12 have been linked to lower risk of overweight. However, whether this is a causal effect of these B-vitamins on obesity risk remains unclear and evidence in older individuals is scarce. This study aimed to assess the role of B-vitamin supplementation and levels on body composition in older individuals. Methods: A double-blind, randomized controlled trial in 2919 participants aged ≥ 65 years with elevated homocysteine levels. The intervention comprised a 2-year supplementation with a combination of folic acid (400 µg) and vitamin B12 (500 µg), or with placebo. Serum folate, vitamin-B12, active vitamin-B12 (HoloTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), and anthropometrics were measured at baseline and after 2 years of follow-up. Dietary intake of folate and vitamin-B12 was measured at baseline in a subsample (n = 603) using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Fat mass index (FMI) and fat-free mass index (FFMI) were assessed with Dual Energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Results: Cross-sectional analyses showed that a 1 nmol/L higher serum folate was associated with a 0.021 kg/m 2 lower BMI (95% CI − 0.039; − 0.004). Higher HoloTC (per pmol/L log-transformed) was associated with a 0.955 kg/m 2 higher FMI (95% CI 0.262; 1.647), and higher MMA (per μgmol/L) was associated with a 1.108 kg/m 2 lower FMI (95% CI − 1.899; − 0.316). However, random allocation of B-vitamins did not have a significant effect on changes in BMI, FMI or FFMI during 2 years of intervention. Conclusions: Although observational data suggested that folate and vitamin B12 status are associated with body composition, random allocation of a supplement with both B-vitamins combined versus placebo did not confirm an effect on BMI or body composition.

KW - BMI

KW - Body composition

KW - Effect of vitamin B12 and folic acid on obesity

KW - Fat (Free) mass

KW - Vitamin B12 and folic acid

U2 - 10.1007/s00394-019-01985-8

DO - 10.1007/s00394-019-01985-8

M3 - Article

JO - European Journal of Nutrition

T2 - European Journal of Nutrition

JF - European Journal of Nutrition

SN - 1436-6207

ER -