Attenuated strength gains during prolonged resistance exercise training in older adults with high inflammatory status

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Abstract

Objectives: Chronic systemic low grade inflammation is associated with the age-related loss of muscle mass. Resistance exercise has been suggested to reduce or lower chronic systemic low grade inflammation. However, systemic chronic low-grade inflammation may adversely affect the adaptive response to exercise training. We investigated the effect of resistance exercise training on systemic chronic low-grade inflammation in older adults. In addition, we studied the association between systemic chronic low-grade inflammation and the adaptive response to exercise training. Design/setting/participants: Frail and pre-frail older adults (61 subjects) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance exercise training. Frailty was assessed using the Fried frailty criteria. Measurements: Lean body mass (DXA), strength (1RM), circulating levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were measured prior to exercise training, after 12 weeks of training, and after 24 weeks of training. Results: Prolonged progressive resistance exercise training did not affect circulating levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. However, exercise training led to a small but significant increase of 0.052 pg/mL in IL-1β. Higher circulating levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-6 during the training period were negatively associated with strength gains for the leg press. A doubling of plasma TNF-α, IL-8 or IL-6 resulted in reduced strength gains for leg press with coefficients of −3.52, −3.42 and −1.54 respectively. High levels of circulating TNF-α were also associated with decreased strength gains for the leg extension (coefficient −1.50). Inflammatory cytokines did not appear to have an effect on gains in lean mass. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that increased levels of plasma cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8) are associated with lower strength gains during resistance exercise training.
LanguageEnglish
Pages154-158
JournalExperimental Gerontology
Volume106
Early online date20 Feb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018

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Resistance Training
Exercise
Interleukin-8
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Interleukin-6
Inflammation
Leg
Cytokines
Frail Elderly
Plasmas
Muscle
Muscles

Cite this

@article{7bceb7935936402b85cab40eab33affd,
title = "Attenuated strength gains during prolonged resistance exercise training in older adults with high inflammatory status",
abstract = "Objectives: Chronic systemic low grade inflammation is associated with the age-related loss of muscle mass. Resistance exercise has been suggested to reduce or lower chronic systemic low grade inflammation. However, systemic chronic low-grade inflammation may adversely affect the adaptive response to exercise training. We investigated the effect of resistance exercise training on systemic chronic low-grade inflammation in older adults. In addition, we studied the association between systemic chronic low-grade inflammation and the adaptive response to exercise training. Design/setting/participants: Frail and pre-frail older adults (61 subjects) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance exercise training. Frailty was assessed using the Fried frailty criteria. Measurements: Lean body mass (DXA), strength (1RM), circulating levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were measured prior to exercise training, after 12 weeks of training, and after 24 weeks of training. Results: Prolonged progressive resistance exercise training did not affect circulating levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. However, exercise training led to a small but significant increase of 0.052 pg/mL in IL-1β. Higher circulating levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-6 during the training period were negatively associated with strength gains for the leg press. A doubling of plasma TNF-α, IL-8 or IL-6 resulted in reduced strength gains for leg press with coefficients of −3.52, −3.42 and −1.54 respectively. High levels of circulating TNF-α were also associated with decreased strength gains for the leg extension (coefficient −1.50). Inflammatory cytokines did not appear to have an effect on gains in lean mass. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that increased levels of plasma cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8) are associated with lower strength gains during resistance exercise training.",
author = "R.W.J. Hangelbroek and P. Knuiman and Michael Tieland and {de Groot}, C.P.G.M.",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.exger.2018.02.008",
language = "English",
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pages = "154--158",
journal = "Experimental Gerontology",
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Attenuated strength gains during prolonged resistance exercise training in older adults with high inflammatory status. / Hangelbroek, R.W.J.; Knuiman, P.; Tieland, Michael; de Groot, C.P.G.M.

In: Experimental Gerontology, Vol. 106, 06.2018, p. 154-158.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attenuated strength gains during prolonged resistance exercise training in older adults with high inflammatory status

AU - Hangelbroek, R.W.J.

AU - Knuiman, P.

AU - Tieland, Michael

AU - de Groot, C.P.G.M.

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - Objectives: Chronic systemic low grade inflammation is associated with the age-related loss of muscle mass. Resistance exercise has been suggested to reduce or lower chronic systemic low grade inflammation. However, systemic chronic low-grade inflammation may adversely affect the adaptive response to exercise training. We investigated the effect of resistance exercise training on systemic chronic low-grade inflammation in older adults. In addition, we studied the association between systemic chronic low-grade inflammation and the adaptive response to exercise training. Design/setting/participants: Frail and pre-frail older adults (61 subjects) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance exercise training. Frailty was assessed using the Fried frailty criteria. Measurements: Lean body mass (DXA), strength (1RM), circulating levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were measured prior to exercise training, after 12 weeks of training, and after 24 weeks of training. Results: Prolonged progressive resistance exercise training did not affect circulating levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. However, exercise training led to a small but significant increase of 0.052 pg/mL in IL-1β. Higher circulating levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-6 during the training period were negatively associated with strength gains for the leg press. A doubling of plasma TNF-α, IL-8 or IL-6 resulted in reduced strength gains for leg press with coefficients of −3.52, −3.42 and −1.54 respectively. High levels of circulating TNF-α were also associated with decreased strength gains for the leg extension (coefficient −1.50). Inflammatory cytokines did not appear to have an effect on gains in lean mass. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that increased levels of plasma cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8) are associated with lower strength gains during resistance exercise training.

AB - Objectives: Chronic systemic low grade inflammation is associated with the age-related loss of muscle mass. Resistance exercise has been suggested to reduce or lower chronic systemic low grade inflammation. However, systemic chronic low-grade inflammation may adversely affect the adaptive response to exercise training. We investigated the effect of resistance exercise training on systemic chronic low-grade inflammation in older adults. In addition, we studied the association between systemic chronic low-grade inflammation and the adaptive response to exercise training. Design/setting/participants: Frail and pre-frail older adults (61 subjects) performed 24 weeks of progressive resistance exercise training. Frailty was assessed using the Fried frailty criteria. Measurements: Lean body mass (DXA), strength (1RM), circulating levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α were measured prior to exercise training, after 12 weeks of training, and after 24 weeks of training. Results: Prolonged progressive resistance exercise training did not affect circulating levels of IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α. However, exercise training led to a small but significant increase of 0.052 pg/mL in IL-1β. Higher circulating levels of TNF-α, IL-8 and IL-6 during the training period were negatively associated with strength gains for the leg press. A doubling of plasma TNF-α, IL-8 or IL-6 resulted in reduced strength gains for leg press with coefficients of −3.52, −3.42 and −1.54 respectively. High levels of circulating TNF-α were also associated with decreased strength gains for the leg extension (coefficient −1.50). Inflammatory cytokines did not appear to have an effect on gains in lean mass. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that increased levels of plasma cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8) are associated with lower strength gains during resistance exercise training.

U2 - 10.1016/j.exger.2018.02.008

DO - 10.1016/j.exger.2018.02.008

M3 - Article

VL - 106

SP - 154

EP - 158

JO - Experimental Gerontology

T2 - Experimental Gerontology

JF - Experimental Gerontology

SN - 0531-5565

ER -