Athermal Fracture of Elastic Networks: How Rigidity Challenges the Unavoidable Size-Induced Brittleness

Simone Dussi*, Justin Tauber, Jasper Van Der Gucht

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

By performing extensive simulations with unprecedentedly large system sizes, we unveil how rigidity influences the fracture of disordered materials. We observe the largest damage in networks with connectivity close to the isostatic point and when the rupture thresholds are small. However, irrespective of network and spring properties, a more brittle fracture is observed upon increasing system size. Differently from most of the fracture descriptors, the maximum stress drop, a proxy for brittleness, displays a universal nonmonotonic dependence on system size. Based on this uncommon trend it is possible to identify the characteristic system size L∗ at which brittleness kicks in. The more the disorder in network connectivity or in spring thresholds, the larger L∗. Finally, we speculate how this size-induced brittleness is influenced by thermal fluctuations.

Original languageEnglish
Article number018002
JournalPhysical Review Letters
Volume124
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Jan 2020

Fingerprint

brittleness
rigidity
thresholds
disorders
damage
trends
simulation

Cite this

@article{1b36e80914ca43f384b2c3eae55e448d,
title = "Athermal Fracture of Elastic Networks: How Rigidity Challenges the Unavoidable Size-Induced Brittleness",
abstract = "By performing extensive simulations with unprecedentedly large system sizes, we unveil how rigidity influences the fracture of disordered materials. We observe the largest damage in networks with connectivity close to the isostatic point and when the rupture thresholds are small. However, irrespective of network and spring properties, a more brittle fracture is observed upon increasing system size. Differently from most of the fracture descriptors, the maximum stress drop, a proxy for brittleness, displays a universal nonmonotonic dependence on system size. Based on this uncommon trend it is possible to identify the characteristic system size L∗ at which brittleness kicks in. The more the disorder in network connectivity or in spring thresholds, the larger L∗. Finally, we speculate how this size-induced brittleness is influenced by thermal fluctuations.",
author = "Simone Dussi and Justin Tauber and {Van Der Gucht}, Jasper",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1103/PhysRevLett.124.018002",
language = "English",
volume = "124",
journal = "Physical Review Letters",
issn = "0031-9007",
publisher = "American Physical Society",
number = "1",

}

Athermal Fracture of Elastic Networks: How Rigidity Challenges the Unavoidable Size-Induced Brittleness. / Dussi, Simone; Tauber, Justin; Van Der Gucht, Jasper.

In: Physical Review Letters, Vol. 124, No. 1, 018002, 10.01.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Athermal Fracture of Elastic Networks: How Rigidity Challenges the Unavoidable Size-Induced Brittleness

AU - Dussi, Simone

AU - Tauber, Justin

AU - Van Der Gucht, Jasper

PY - 2020/1/10

Y1 - 2020/1/10

N2 - By performing extensive simulations with unprecedentedly large system sizes, we unveil how rigidity influences the fracture of disordered materials. We observe the largest damage in networks with connectivity close to the isostatic point and when the rupture thresholds are small. However, irrespective of network and spring properties, a more brittle fracture is observed upon increasing system size. Differently from most of the fracture descriptors, the maximum stress drop, a proxy for brittleness, displays a universal nonmonotonic dependence on system size. Based on this uncommon trend it is possible to identify the characteristic system size L∗ at which brittleness kicks in. The more the disorder in network connectivity or in spring thresholds, the larger L∗. Finally, we speculate how this size-induced brittleness is influenced by thermal fluctuations.

AB - By performing extensive simulations with unprecedentedly large system sizes, we unveil how rigidity influences the fracture of disordered materials. We observe the largest damage in networks with connectivity close to the isostatic point and when the rupture thresholds are small. However, irrespective of network and spring properties, a more brittle fracture is observed upon increasing system size. Differently from most of the fracture descriptors, the maximum stress drop, a proxy for brittleness, displays a universal nonmonotonic dependence on system size. Based on this uncommon trend it is possible to identify the characteristic system size L∗ at which brittleness kicks in. The more the disorder in network connectivity or in spring thresholds, the larger L∗. Finally, we speculate how this size-induced brittleness is influenced by thermal fluctuations.

U2 - 10.1103/PhysRevLett.124.018002

DO - 10.1103/PhysRevLett.124.018002

M3 - Article

VL - 124

JO - Physical Review Letters

JF - Physical Review Letters

SN - 0031-9007

IS - 1

M1 - 018002

ER -