Assessment of partial resistance to powdery mildew (Podosphaera pannosa) in a tetraploid rose population using a spore-suspension inoculation method

Z. Yan, O. Dolstra, T.W. Prins, P. Stam, P.B. Visser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Powdery mildew (Podosphaera pannosa) is the most important fungal disease in greenhouse roses and is in practice controlled by fungicides. The creation of novel cultivars with durable resistance to powdery mildew is highly desirable. To understand the inheritance of mildew resistance, a tetraploid rose population with a size of 181 seedlings was obtained by crossing two tetraploid genotypes each having partial resistance. The population and its parents were tested under greenhouse conditions with two well-defined monospore isolates (2 and F1) using artificial inoculation with spore suspensions. Disease score at 11 days post-inoculation, latent period and rate of symptom development were used to describe seedling resistance. The tests for both isolates exhibited a wide and significant variation among genotypes for resistance. The distribution of the genotypic means of the disease scores was continuous and showed a considerable transgression. Statistical analysis, scatter plot of disease scores for the isolates, and correlation analyses indicated that the two isolates differed in pathogenicity. The outcome of the tests showed that the inoculation assay with spore suspensions was a reliable and effective way to screen large numbers of genotypes under greenhouse conditions for genetic and breeding studies. This is the first report on spore-suspension inoculation to be used successfully in rose.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-308
JournalEuropean Journal of Plant Pathology
Volume114
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

Keywords

  • disease resistance
  • sphaerotheca-pannosa
  • barley
  • genetics
  • qtls
  • rpp1

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