Arranged to Distraction: How Categorizing Products with Complements versus Substitutes Alters the Experience of Product Choice

E. van Herpen, K. Diehl, C. Poynor

Research output: Contribution to journalAbstractAcademic

Abstract

Although much is known about how substitute products impact consumers¿ decision processes, little is known about how externally provided categorizations involving complementary items affect decisions. If consumers shop for a single target product, complementary items are objectively irrelevant. Yet, our research finds that organizing products with complements distracts consumers, increasing decision time and perceived effort. This distraction occurs across different physical arrangements and is not due to detailed examination of complementary products. At the same time, complementary categorizations are perceived as attractive and inviting, suggesting that their negative effects may be offset by creating an engaging, affectively positive experience
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-83
JournalAdvances in Consumer Research
Volume35
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • search costs
  • recognition
  • strategies
  • customer
  • models

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