Aqueous fractionation yields chemically stable lupin protein isolates

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Abstract

The chemical stability of lupin protein isolates (LPIs) obtained through aqueous fractionation (AF, i.e. fractionation without the use of an organic solvent) at 4 °C or 20 °C was assessed. AF of lupin seeds results in LPIs containing 2 wt.% oil. This oil is composed of mono- and poly-unsaturated fatty acids and the isolate may thus be prone to lipid and protein oxidation. Lipid and protein oxidation marker values of LPIs obtained at 4 °C and at 20 °C were below the acceptability limit for edible vegetable oils and meat tissue protein; the level of lipid oxidation markers was lower at 20 °C than at 4 °C. The fibre-rich pellet and the protein-rich supernatant obtained after AF also had lower levels of oxidation markers at 20 °C than at 4 °C. This is probably the result of a higher solubility of oxygen in water at lower temperature, which could promote lipid oxidation. The differences between fractions can be explained by the differences in their composition; the fibre-rich pellet contains polysaccharides that potentially have an anti-oxidative effect, while the protein-rich supernatant is rich in sulphur-rich proteins that may scavenge metal ions and free radicals from the aqueous phase. Additionally, the differences in solubility of metal ions and metal-chelating properties of protein at pH 4.5 and pH 7.0 explain the higher level of oxidation in the LPI at pH 4.5 compared with the LPI at pH 7.0. The application of a heat treatment to reduce oxidation decreased the protein and oil recovery values, and increased oxidation values above the acceptability limit. Therefore, AF at 20 °C is the most suitable process to obtain chemically stable LPIs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-90
JournalFood Research International
Volume72
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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Keywords

  • in-water emulsions
  • seed oil bodies
  • oxidative stability
  • antioxidant properties
  • lipid oxidation
  • physicochemical properties
  • functional-properties
  • quality
  • acids
  • polysaccharides

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