Approach for designing context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce postharvest losses: Case study on tomato value chains in Nigeria

Christine Plaisier, Milindi Sibomana, Johannes van der Waal, Luud Clercx, Coen P.A. van Wagenberg, Youri Dijkxhoorn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Development projects on interventions to reduce postharvest losses (PHL) are often implemented largely independently of the specific context and without sufficient adaptation to the needs of people who are supposed to use them. An approach is needed for the design and implementation of specific, locally owned interventions in development projects. Our approach is based on Participatory Development and includes Living Lab and World Cafés. We applied the approach in a case study on reducing PHL in tomato value chains in Nigeria. The approach consists of nine steps. After scoping the sector, selected value chain stakeholders (case: farmers, transporters, traders, retailers) were gathered in Living Lab workshops. In the workshop, participants analyzed the product, information, and monetary flows in their own value chain, identified causes for PHL, and selected potential interventions to reduce these (case: plastic crates instead of raffia baskets to transport tomatoes). Selected interventions were implemented, tested, and monitored in pilot projects with the workshop participants. This was followed by an evaluation workshop. At the end of the case study, 89% of participants bought crates to keep using them in their value chain. Our approach resulted in context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce PHL in the case study on tomato value chains in Nigeria. Its application in other countries, commodities, or interventions is needed to determine the effectiveness of the approach in a broader scope.

LanguageEnglish
Article number247
Number of pages16
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

value chain
Nigeria
development project
pilot project
Plastics
commodity
loss
stakeholder
farmer
plastic
cause
evaluation

Keywords

  • Behavioural change
  • Context-specific interventions
  • Nigeria
  • Participatory approach
  • Plastic crate
  • Postharvest losses
  • Raffia basket
  • Supply chain
  • Tomato
  • Value chain development

Cite this

@article{9dc128afb15d4743b937febceeb6e832,
title = "Approach for designing context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce postharvest losses: Case study on tomato value chains in Nigeria",
abstract = "Development projects on interventions to reduce postharvest losses (PHL) are often implemented largely independently of the specific context and without sufficient adaptation to the needs of people who are supposed to use them. An approach is needed for the design and implementation of specific, locally owned interventions in development projects. Our approach is based on Participatory Development and includes Living Lab and World Caf{\'e}s. We applied the approach in a case study on reducing PHL in tomato value chains in Nigeria. The approach consists of nine steps. After scoping the sector, selected value chain stakeholders (case: farmers, transporters, traders, retailers) were gathered in Living Lab workshops. In the workshop, participants analyzed the product, information, and monetary flows in their own value chain, identified causes for PHL, and selected potential interventions to reduce these (case: plastic crates instead of raffia baskets to transport tomatoes). Selected interventions were implemented, tested, and monitored in pilot projects with the workshop participants. This was followed by an evaluation workshop. At the end of the case study, 89{\%} of participants bought crates to keep using them in their value chain. Our approach resulted in context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce PHL in the case study on tomato value chains in Nigeria. Its application in other countries, commodities, or interventions is needed to determine the effectiveness of the approach in a broader scope.",
keywords = "Behavioural change, Context-specific interventions, Nigeria, Participatory approach, Plastic crate, Postharvest losses, Raffia basket, Supply chain, Tomato, Value chain development",
author = "Christine Plaisier and Milindi Sibomana and {van der Waal}, Johannes and Luud Clercx and {van Wagenberg}, {Coen P.A.} and Youri Dijkxhoorn",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "7",
doi = "10.3390/su11010247",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Sustainability",
issn = "2071-1050",
publisher = "MDPI",
number = "1",

}

Approach for designing context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce postharvest losses : Case study on tomato value chains in Nigeria. / Plaisier, Christine; Sibomana, Milindi; van der Waal, Johannes; Clercx, Luud; van Wagenberg, Coen P.A.; Dijkxhoorn, Youri.

In: Sustainability (Switzerland), Vol. 11, No. 1, 247, 07.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Approach for designing context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce postharvest losses

T2 - Sustainability

AU - Plaisier, Christine

AU - Sibomana, Milindi

AU - van der Waal, Johannes

AU - Clercx, Luud

AU - van Wagenberg, Coen P.A.

AU - Dijkxhoorn, Youri

PY - 2019/1/7

Y1 - 2019/1/7

N2 - Development projects on interventions to reduce postharvest losses (PHL) are often implemented largely independently of the specific context and without sufficient adaptation to the needs of people who are supposed to use them. An approach is needed for the design and implementation of specific, locally owned interventions in development projects. Our approach is based on Participatory Development and includes Living Lab and World Cafés. We applied the approach in a case study on reducing PHL in tomato value chains in Nigeria. The approach consists of nine steps. After scoping the sector, selected value chain stakeholders (case: farmers, transporters, traders, retailers) were gathered in Living Lab workshops. In the workshop, participants analyzed the product, information, and monetary flows in their own value chain, identified causes for PHL, and selected potential interventions to reduce these (case: plastic crates instead of raffia baskets to transport tomatoes). Selected interventions were implemented, tested, and monitored in pilot projects with the workshop participants. This was followed by an evaluation workshop. At the end of the case study, 89% of participants bought crates to keep using them in their value chain. Our approach resulted in context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce PHL in the case study on tomato value chains in Nigeria. Its application in other countries, commodities, or interventions is needed to determine the effectiveness of the approach in a broader scope.

AB - Development projects on interventions to reduce postharvest losses (PHL) are often implemented largely independently of the specific context and without sufficient adaptation to the needs of people who are supposed to use them. An approach is needed for the design and implementation of specific, locally owned interventions in development projects. Our approach is based on Participatory Development and includes Living Lab and World Cafés. We applied the approach in a case study on reducing PHL in tomato value chains in Nigeria. The approach consists of nine steps. After scoping the sector, selected value chain stakeholders (case: farmers, transporters, traders, retailers) were gathered in Living Lab workshops. In the workshop, participants analyzed the product, information, and monetary flows in their own value chain, identified causes for PHL, and selected potential interventions to reduce these (case: plastic crates instead of raffia baskets to transport tomatoes). Selected interventions were implemented, tested, and monitored in pilot projects with the workshop participants. This was followed by an evaluation workshop. At the end of the case study, 89% of participants bought crates to keep using them in their value chain. Our approach resulted in context-specific, locally owned interventions to reduce PHL in the case study on tomato value chains in Nigeria. Its application in other countries, commodities, or interventions is needed to determine the effectiveness of the approach in a broader scope.

KW - Behavioural change

KW - Context-specific interventions

KW - Nigeria

KW - Participatory approach

KW - Plastic crate

KW - Postharvest losses

KW - Raffia basket

KW - Supply chain

KW - Tomato

KW - Value chain development

U2 - 10.3390/su11010247

DO - 10.3390/su11010247

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - Sustainability

JF - Sustainability

SN - 2071-1050

IS - 1

M1 - 247

ER -