Application of Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in a Nutritional Intervention Study: Differential Responses during Five Hours Following Consumption of a High- and a Low-Fat Dairy Drink

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Abstract

Scope: Exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a possible relevant target for noninvasive assessment of metabolic responses. Using a breathomics approach, it is aimed to explore whether lipid intake influences VOC profiles in exhaled air, and to obtain insight in intra- and interindividual variations. Methods and results: Three human interventions are performed. In the first, 12 males consume a high-fat drink on three study days. In the second, 12 males receive a high- and a low-fat drink on 6 days. In the third, three volunteers consume the high-fat drink again for tentative compound identification. Participants are asked to exhale, for 5 h postprandial with 15–20 min intervals, into a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, and VOCs in exhaled air are measured. Consumption of a drink alters the VOC profile, with considerable interindividual variation and quantitative intraindividual differences between days. Consumption of two different drinks results in a distinct VOC profile, caused by several specific m/z values. Most of these compounds are identified as being related to ketone body formation and lipid oxidation, showing an increase in high- versus low-fat drink. Conclusion: Exhaled VOCs have the potential to assess differences in metabolic responses induced by nutrition, especially when day-to-day variation can be minimized.

LanguageEnglish
Article number1900189
JournalMolecular Nutrition and Food Research
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 21 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Volatile Organic Compounds
nutritional intervention
volatile organic compounds
dairies
Fats
lipids
Air
Lipids
ketone bodies
Ketone Bodies
air
fat intake
spectrometers
protons
volunteers
Protons
Volunteers
lipid peroxidation
nutrition

Keywords

  • breath analysis
  • breathomics
  • inter- and intraindividual variation
  • lipids
  • volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

Cite this

@article{0cac2ba18e3f4e3f83111b0a3e45d43b,
title = "Application of Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in a Nutritional Intervention Study: Differential Responses during Five Hours Following Consumption of a High- and a Low-Fat Dairy Drink",
abstract = "Scope: Exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a possible relevant target for noninvasive assessment of metabolic responses. Using a breathomics approach, it is aimed to explore whether lipid intake influences VOC profiles in exhaled air, and to obtain insight in intra- and interindividual variations. Methods and results: Three human interventions are performed. In the first, 12 males consume a high-fat drink on three study days. In the second, 12 males receive a high- and a low-fat drink on 6 days. In the third, three volunteers consume the high-fat drink again for tentative compound identification. Participants are asked to exhale, for 5 h postprandial with 15–20 min intervals, into a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, and VOCs in exhaled air are measured. Consumption of a drink alters the VOC profile, with considerable interindividual variation and quantitative intraindividual differences between days. Consumption of two different drinks results in a distinct VOC profile, caused by several specific m/z values. Most of these compounds are identified as being related to ketone body formation and lipid oxidation, showing an increase in high- versus low-fat drink. Conclusion: Exhaled VOCs have the potential to assess differences in metabolic responses induced by nutrition, especially when day-to-day variation can be minimized.",
keywords = "breath analysis, breathomics, inter- and intraindividual variation, lipids, volatile organic compounds (VOCs)",
author = "Hageman, {Jeske H.J.} and Nieuwenhuizen, {Arie G.} and {van Ruth}, {Saskia M.} and Hageman, {Jos A.} and Jaap Keijer",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1002/mnfr.201900189",
language = "English",
journal = "Molecular Nutrition & Food Research",
issn = "1613-4125",
publisher = "Wiley-VCH Verlag",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Application of Volatile Organic Compound Analysis in a Nutritional Intervention Study: Differential Responses during Five Hours Following Consumption of a High- and a Low-Fat Dairy Drink

AU - Hageman, Jeske H.J.

AU - Nieuwenhuizen, Arie G.

AU - van Ruth, Saskia M.

AU - Hageman, Jos A.

AU - Keijer, Jaap

PY - 2019/7/21

Y1 - 2019/7/21

N2 - Scope: Exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a possible relevant target for noninvasive assessment of metabolic responses. Using a breathomics approach, it is aimed to explore whether lipid intake influences VOC profiles in exhaled air, and to obtain insight in intra- and interindividual variations. Methods and results: Three human interventions are performed. In the first, 12 males consume a high-fat drink on three study days. In the second, 12 males receive a high- and a low-fat drink on 6 days. In the third, three volunteers consume the high-fat drink again for tentative compound identification. Participants are asked to exhale, for 5 h postprandial with 15–20 min intervals, into a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, and VOCs in exhaled air are measured. Consumption of a drink alters the VOC profile, with considerable interindividual variation and quantitative intraindividual differences between days. Consumption of two different drinks results in a distinct VOC profile, caused by several specific m/z values. Most of these compounds are identified as being related to ketone body formation and lipid oxidation, showing an increase in high- versus low-fat drink. Conclusion: Exhaled VOCs have the potential to assess differences in metabolic responses induced by nutrition, especially when day-to-day variation can be minimized.

AB - Scope: Exhaled volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are a possible relevant target for noninvasive assessment of metabolic responses. Using a breathomics approach, it is aimed to explore whether lipid intake influences VOC profiles in exhaled air, and to obtain insight in intra- and interindividual variations. Methods and results: Three human interventions are performed. In the first, 12 males consume a high-fat drink on three study days. In the second, 12 males receive a high- and a low-fat drink on 6 days. In the third, three volunteers consume the high-fat drink again for tentative compound identification. Participants are asked to exhale, for 5 h postprandial with 15–20 min intervals, into a proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometer, and VOCs in exhaled air are measured. Consumption of a drink alters the VOC profile, with considerable interindividual variation and quantitative intraindividual differences between days. Consumption of two different drinks results in a distinct VOC profile, caused by several specific m/z values. Most of these compounds are identified as being related to ketone body formation and lipid oxidation, showing an increase in high- versus low-fat drink. Conclusion: Exhaled VOCs have the potential to assess differences in metabolic responses induced by nutrition, especially when day-to-day variation can be minimized.

KW - breath analysis

KW - breathomics

KW - inter- and intraindividual variation

KW - lipids

KW - volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

U2 - 10.1002/mnfr.201900189

DO - 10.1002/mnfr.201900189

M3 - Article

JO - Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

T2 - Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

JF - Molecular Nutrition & Food Research

SN - 1613-4125

M1 - 1900189

ER -