Application of oral tissue in tribological measurements in an emulsion perception context

D.M. Dresselhuis, E.H.A. de Hoog, M.A. Cohen Stuart, G.A. van Aken

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

128 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tribological measurements are indicated to be a tool in predicting the creamy in-mouth sensation of a food product. Tribological measurements relating lubricational behaviour of a food product to perception are often conducted with artificial surfaces. In this work we used pig's tongue to mimic the human tongue, which has the advantage of having surface characteristics similar to a human tongue. Using biological material has also some drawbacks. The most important drawbacks are the limited availability, the individual differences between the tongues, and the relative fast degradation of the tissue. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics of the tongue in terms of surface roughness, deformability and wetting properties. The knowledge on these characteristics can serve as reference when using modified poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS) in tribological experiments relating perception to in-mouth friction. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these characteristics are crucial in tribological studies to draw rightful conclusions. Tribological measurements were performed with an experimental set-up combining friction measurement with confocal scanning laser microscope (CSLM) observations. We identified the importance of these characteristics for tribology measurements performed in relation to sensory perception. It is shown that the tongue surface has some very typical characteristics, including the presence of papillae and a hydrophilic mucus layer, and an elastic modulus that is at least two orders of magnitude smaller than that of smooth PDMS surfaces. The different surface characteristics appear to lead to completely different lubricational behaviour of the food emulsions between these surfaces. Furthermore, for food emulsions differences in the occurrence of coalescence were found between shearing with pig's tongue and PDMS surfaces. Therefore, we conclude that for studies relating sensory properties of food systems to lubricational behaviour, a careful choice of representative surfaces is essential and that modification of smooth PDMS can result in surfaces having characteristics closer to tongue tissue
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-335
JournalFood Hydrocolloids
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • in-water emulsions
  • dairy-products
  • human tongue
  • lubrication
  • creaminess
  • behavior
  • chocolate
  • texture
  • cavity
  • saliva

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