Antibacterial Effects of the Essential Oils of CommonlyConsumed Medicinal Herbs Using an In Vitro Model.

M. Sokovic, J. Glamoclija, P.D. Marin, D. Brkic, L.J.L.D. van Griensven

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    303 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The chemical composition and antibacterial activity of essential oils from 10 commonly consumed herbs: Citrus aurantium, C. limon, Lavandula angustifolia, Matricaria chamomilla, Mentha piperita, M. spicata, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Thymus vulgaris and Salvia officinalis have been determined. The antibacterial activity of these oils and their main components; i.e. camphor, carvacrol, 1,8-cineole, linalool, linalyl acetate, limonene, menthol, a-pinene, b-pinene, and thymol were assayed against the human pathogenic bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Micrococcus flavus, Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella enteritidis, S. epidermidis, S. typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus. The highest and broadest activity was shown by O. vulgare oil. Carvacrol had the highest antibacterial activity among the tested components.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)7532-7546
    JournalMolecules
    Volume15
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2010

    Keywords

    • oregano essential oil
    • salmonella-enteritidis
    • listeria-monocytogenes
    • antifungal activities
    • chemical-composition
    • escherichia-coli
    • fungi

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