Analysis of uncertainties in the inference of groundwater dynamics from gravity recovery and climate experiment observations over Australia

A.I.J.M. Van Dijk*, R.S. Crosbie, J.L. Peña-Arancibia, P. Tregoning, S. McClusky

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paperpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Groundwater management in Australia is complicated by the cost and scarcity (vs. spatial variability) of bore monitoring. Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) remote sensing may alleviate this problem, but derived groundwater storage estimates are subject to errors, particularly, in total water storage (TWS) retrieval and in estimated soil moisture contributions to TWS. We quantified the uncertainties from both sources over Australia. In addition, for 12 regions we compared groundwater changes derived from GRACE with up-scaled groundwater bore measurements. Favourable agreement was found for regions with many bores, but a direct comparison was complicated by the scarcity and biased positioning of bores; uncertainty in soil moisture model assumptions; and uncertainty in the aquifer property that translates groundwater level into storage. Further improvements in spatial GRACE TWS resolution and in soil moisture estimation accuracy will be required to increase the utility of GRACE for groundwater management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages1318-1320
Number of pages3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
Event2012 32nd IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS 2012 - Munich, Germany
Duration: 22 Jul 201227 Jul 2012

Conference

Conference2012 32nd IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium, IGARSS 2012
Country/TerritoryGermany
CityMunich
Period22/07/1227/07/12

Keywords

  • GRACE
  • gravimetry
  • groundwater
  • soil moisture
  • water

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