Analysis of metabolome changes in the bile acid pool in feces and plasma of antibiotic-treated rats

C. Behr, M. Slopianka, V. Haake, V. Strauss, S. Sperber, H. Kamp, T. Walk, K. Beekmann, I.M.C.M. Rietjens, B. van Ravenzwaay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The bile acid-liver-gut microbiota axis plays an important role in the host's health. The gut microbiota has an impact on the bile acid pool, but also the bile acids themselves can influence the gut microbiota composition. In this study, six antibiotics from five different classes (i.e. lincosamides, glycopeptides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides) were used to modulate microbial communities of Wistar rats to elucidate changes in the bile acid metabolism and to identify key metabolites in the bile acid pool related to gut microbial changes. 20 primary and secondary bile acids were analyzed in plasma and feces of control and treated animals. Antibiotics treatment induced significant changes in primary and secondary bile acids in both matrices. Taurine-conjugated primary bile acids significantly increased in plasma and feces. Contrary, cholic acid and most of the analyzed secondary bile acids significantly decreased in plasma, and cholic acid accumulated in the feces after treatment with all antibiotics but roxithromycin. Despite the different activity spectra of the antibiotics applied against gut microbes, the overall effect on the bile acid pool tended to be similar in both matrices except for streptomycin. These results show that changes in the gut microbial community affect the bile acid pool in plasma and feces and that changes in the bile acid profile can be indicative of alterations of the gut microbiome. Due to the important role of bile acids for the host, changes in the bile acid pool can have severe consequences for the host.

LanguageEnglish
Pages79-87
JournalToxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Volume363
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Metabolome
Bile Acids and Salts
Feces
Rats
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Plasmas
Cholic Acid
Lincosamides
Roxithromycin
Glycopeptides
Taurine
Fluoroquinolones
Macrolides
Aminoglycosides
Streptomycin
Metabolites
Metabolism
Liver
Wistar Rats

Keywords

  • Antibiotics
  • Bile acid profiling
  • Gut microbiome
  • Metabolomics
  • Microbiome-related metabolites
  • Repeated dose oral toxicity study

Cite this

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title = "Analysis of metabolome changes in the bile acid pool in feces and plasma of antibiotic-treated rats",
abstract = "The bile acid-liver-gut microbiota axis plays an important role in the host's health. The gut microbiota has an impact on the bile acid pool, but also the bile acids themselves can influence the gut microbiota composition. In this study, six antibiotics from five different classes (i.e. lincosamides, glycopeptides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides) were used to modulate microbial communities of Wistar rats to elucidate changes in the bile acid metabolism and to identify key metabolites in the bile acid pool related to gut microbial changes. 20 primary and secondary bile acids were analyzed in plasma and feces of control and treated animals. Antibiotics treatment induced significant changes in primary and secondary bile acids in both matrices. Taurine-conjugated primary bile acids significantly increased in plasma and feces. Contrary, cholic acid and most of the analyzed secondary bile acids significantly decreased in plasma, and cholic acid accumulated in the feces after treatment with all antibiotics but roxithromycin. Despite the different activity spectra of the antibiotics applied against gut microbes, the overall effect on the bile acid pool tended to be similar in both matrices except for streptomycin. These results show that changes in the gut microbial community affect the bile acid pool in plasma and feces and that changes in the bile acid profile can be indicative of alterations of the gut microbiome. Due to the important role of bile acids for the host, changes in the bile acid pool can have severe consequences for the host.",
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author = "C. Behr and M. Slopianka and V. Haake and V. Strauss and S. Sperber and H. Kamp and T. Walk and K. Beekmann and I.M.C.M. Rietjens and {van Ravenzwaay}, B.",
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Analysis of metabolome changes in the bile acid pool in feces and plasma of antibiotic-treated rats. / Behr, C.; Slopianka, M.; Haake, V.; Strauss, V.; Sperber, S.; Kamp, H.; Walk, T.; Beekmann, K.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; van Ravenzwaay, B.

In: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Vol. 363, 15.01.2019, p. 79-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of metabolome changes in the bile acid pool in feces and plasma of antibiotic-treated rats

AU - Behr, C.

AU - Slopianka, M.

AU - Haake, V.

AU - Strauss, V.

AU - Sperber, S.

AU - Kamp, H.

AU - Walk, T.

AU - Beekmann, K.

AU - Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

AU - van Ravenzwaay, B.

PY - 2019/1/15

Y1 - 2019/1/15

N2 - The bile acid-liver-gut microbiota axis plays an important role in the host's health. The gut microbiota has an impact on the bile acid pool, but also the bile acids themselves can influence the gut microbiota composition. In this study, six antibiotics from five different classes (i.e. lincosamides, glycopeptides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides) were used to modulate microbial communities of Wistar rats to elucidate changes in the bile acid metabolism and to identify key metabolites in the bile acid pool related to gut microbial changes. 20 primary and secondary bile acids were analyzed in plasma and feces of control and treated animals. Antibiotics treatment induced significant changes in primary and secondary bile acids in both matrices. Taurine-conjugated primary bile acids significantly increased in plasma and feces. Contrary, cholic acid and most of the analyzed secondary bile acids significantly decreased in plasma, and cholic acid accumulated in the feces after treatment with all antibiotics but roxithromycin. Despite the different activity spectra of the antibiotics applied against gut microbes, the overall effect on the bile acid pool tended to be similar in both matrices except for streptomycin. These results show that changes in the gut microbial community affect the bile acid pool in plasma and feces and that changes in the bile acid profile can be indicative of alterations of the gut microbiome. Due to the important role of bile acids for the host, changes in the bile acid pool can have severe consequences for the host.

AB - The bile acid-liver-gut microbiota axis plays an important role in the host's health. The gut microbiota has an impact on the bile acid pool, but also the bile acids themselves can influence the gut microbiota composition. In this study, six antibiotics from five different classes (i.e. lincosamides, glycopeptides, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides) were used to modulate microbial communities of Wistar rats to elucidate changes in the bile acid metabolism and to identify key metabolites in the bile acid pool related to gut microbial changes. 20 primary and secondary bile acids were analyzed in plasma and feces of control and treated animals. Antibiotics treatment induced significant changes in primary and secondary bile acids in both matrices. Taurine-conjugated primary bile acids significantly increased in plasma and feces. Contrary, cholic acid and most of the analyzed secondary bile acids significantly decreased in plasma, and cholic acid accumulated in the feces after treatment with all antibiotics but roxithromycin. Despite the different activity spectra of the antibiotics applied against gut microbes, the overall effect on the bile acid pool tended to be similar in both matrices except for streptomycin. These results show that changes in the gut microbial community affect the bile acid pool in plasma and feces and that changes in the bile acid profile can be indicative of alterations of the gut microbiome. Due to the important role of bile acids for the host, changes in the bile acid pool can have severe consequences for the host.

KW - Antibiotics

KW - Bile acid profiling

KW - Gut microbiome

KW - Metabolomics

KW - Microbiome-related metabolites

KW - Repeated dose oral toxicity study

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DO - 10.1016/j.taap.2018.11.012

M3 - Article

VL - 363

SP - 79

EP - 87

JO - Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology

T2 - Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology

JF - Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology

SN - 0041-008X

ER -