An overview on non-CO2 greenhouse gases

T. Pulles, A.R. van Amstel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-CO2 greenhouse gases, included in the Kyoto Protocol, are methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hexafluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorinated compounds (PFC) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). Together they account for about 25% of the present global greenhouse gas emissions. Reductions in emissions of these gases have occurred in the industrialised countries, and they contribute to the efforts to reach the target of 5% greenhouse gas emission reduction as agreed in the Kyoto Protocol for these countries. Globally however, greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase as do the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere. The relation between emissions and concentrations is not clear for all non-CO2 greenhouse gases. This especially holds for methane. This article discusses the contribution of non-CO2 greenhouse gases to global climate forcing within the causal chain approach of the DPSIR schema (Drivers, Pressures, State, Impact and Response) as a background for the studies presented in this special issue. Although considerable reductions in non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions are expected in the first commitment period under the Climate Convention (Kyoto Protocol), it is argued that further substantial emission reductions in subsequent commitment periods for the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) are difficult to achieve
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3-19
JournalJournal of integrative Environmental Sciences
Volume7
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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Greenhouse gases
greenhouse gas
Gases
Gas emissions
Kyoto Protocol
Methane
Climate
methane
Sulfur hexafluoride
Sulfur Hexafluoride
climate forcing
Naphazoline
nitrous oxide
gas
Nitrous Oxide
global climate
Atmosphere
Developed Countries
sulfur
Oxides

Cite this

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title = "An overview on non-CO2 greenhouse gases",
abstract = "Non-CO2 greenhouse gases, included in the Kyoto Protocol, are methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hexafluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorinated compounds (PFC) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). Together they account for about 25{\%} of the present global greenhouse gas emissions. Reductions in emissions of these gases have occurred in the industrialised countries, and they contribute to the efforts to reach the target of 5{\%} greenhouse gas emission reduction as agreed in the Kyoto Protocol for these countries. Globally however, greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase as do the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere. The relation between emissions and concentrations is not clear for all non-CO2 greenhouse gases. This especially holds for methane. This article discusses the contribution of non-CO2 greenhouse gases to global climate forcing within the causal chain approach of the DPSIR schema (Drivers, Pressures, State, Impact and Response) as a background for the studies presented in this special issue. Although considerable reductions in non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions are expected in the first commitment period under the Climate Convention (Kyoto Protocol), it is argued that further substantial emission reductions in subsequent commitment periods for the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) are difficult to achieve",
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language = "English",
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An overview on non-CO2 greenhouse gases. / Pulles, T.; van Amstel, A.R.

In: Journal of integrative Environmental Sciences, Vol. 7, No. S1, 2010, p. 3-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - van Amstel, A.R.

PY - 2010

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AB - Non-CO2 greenhouse gases, included in the Kyoto Protocol, are methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), hexafluorocarbons (HFC), perfluorinated compounds (PFC) and sulphur hexafluoride (SF6). Together they account for about 25% of the present global greenhouse gas emissions. Reductions in emissions of these gases have occurred in the industrialised countries, and they contribute to the efforts to reach the target of 5% greenhouse gas emission reduction as agreed in the Kyoto Protocol for these countries. Globally however, greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase as do the concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere. The relation between emissions and concentrations is not clear for all non-CO2 greenhouse gases. This especially holds for methane. This article discusses the contribution of non-CO2 greenhouse gases to global climate forcing within the causal chain approach of the DPSIR schema (Drivers, Pressures, State, Impact and Response) as a background for the studies presented in this special issue. Although considerable reductions in non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions are expected in the first commitment period under the Climate Convention (Kyoto Protocol), it is argued that further substantial emission reductions in subsequent commitment periods for the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gases (CH4 and N2O) are difficult to achieve

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