An FTIR-DRIFT study on river sediment particle structure: Implications for biofilm dynamics and pollutant binding

T. Galle, B. van Lagen, A. Kurtenbach, R. Bierl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectrometry was applied to a set of sediment samples collected by traps over one and a half years in a midmountainous river. Dynamic changes in hydrological and life-cycle conditions generated sediment particles of different Corg content and organic composition. Periods in the midst of or shortly after flood events left particles poor in Corg content with spectral features that were enriched in carboxylic and aromatic signals. These are characteristic of terrestrial oxidized vascular plant debris. Low-flow conditions saw the consequent build-up of amide, aliphatic, and polysaccharide moieties as expected for autochthonous biofilm derived material. A peak ratio of two bands representing the alternation of these two types of organic matter showed that flood particle Corg had a higher affinity for metals than the high Corg of mature biofilms, probably owing to higher COO- contents in the first. The relative dietary bioavailability of the metals from sediment Corg, which is related to the nutritional value of the substrate, is therefore probably lower in the aftermath of a flood than in prolonged low-flow situations. This needs to be accounted for in future metal speciation and bioavailability modeling approaches.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4496-4502
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume38
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • chromatography-mass spectrometry
  • particulate organic-matter
  • chemical-equilibrium model
  • humic substances
  • suspended sediment
  • blackwater river
  • macoma-balthica
  • humber rivers
  • fulvic-acids
  • waste-water

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