An African Approach for Risk Reduction of Soil Contaminated by Obsolete Pesticides

J. Harmsen, M. Ammati, M. Davies, C.H. Sylla, T. Sidibe, H.K. Traore, A. Diallo, A. Sy Demba

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paperAcademic

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Since the 1950s, large amounts of pesticides were shipped to Africa for locust control, but did not arrive at the proper place or proper time thereby rendering them obsolete. Stockpiles of these pesticides have created a serious problem and The Africa Stockpiles Programme (ASP), launched by FAO, is designed to rid Africa of stockpiles and to dispose of them in an environmentally sound manner (ASP, 2009). From July to August 2007, an investigation mission was organized by FAO pesticide management programme, in collaboration with Wageningen University and Research Centre and the relevant national counterpart institutions of the Ministries of Agriculture and the Ministries of Environment in Mali and Mauritania. During the investigation, three sites in Mali and three sites in Mauretania were visited in the summer of 2007. High concentrations of pesticides were found in soils on the stockpiles. From a riskbased point of view, contaminations are only a risk if they are or may become available. Based on the results obtained and results of analysis of the samples taken, risk reduction proposals have been developed. All proposals are based on stimulation of the possibilities of biological degradation of the pesticides in combination with isolation and preventing rain water from transporting the pesticides. The results were discussed in May 2008 and the first implementation was started in Molodo (Mali) in July 2008.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2009
EventTenth International In Situ and On-Site Biomeditation Symposium, Baltimore, MD, USA -
Duration: 5 May 20098 May 2009

Conference

ConferenceTenth International In Situ and On-Site Biomeditation Symposium, Baltimore, MD, USA
Period5/05/098/05/09

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