African water storage pots for the delivery of the Entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae to the Malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and Anopheles funestus

M. Farenhorst, D. Farina, E.J. Scholte, W. Takken, R.H. Hunt, M. Coetzee, B.G.J. Knols

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the use of African water storage pots for point source application of Metarhizium anisopliae against the malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae s.s. and An. funestus. Clay pots were shown to be attractive resting sites for male and female An. gambiae s.s. and were not repellent after impregnation with fungus. M. anisopliae was highly infective and virulent after spray application inside pots. At a dosage of 4 x 1010 conidia/m2, an average of 95 ± 1.2% of An. gambiae s.s. obtained a fungal infection. A lower dosage of 1 x 1010 conidia/m2 infected an average of 91.5 ± 0.6% of An. gambiae s.s. and 91.8 ± 1.2% of An. funestus mosquitoes. Fungal infection significantly reduced mosquito longevity, as shown by differences between survival curves and LT50 values. These pots are suitable for application of entomopathogenic fungi against malaria vectors and their potential for sustainable field implementation is discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)910-916
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume78
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • western kenya
  • mosquitos
  • transmission
  • infection
  • complex

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