Adsorption, transformation, and bioavailability of the fungicides carbendazim and iprodione in soil, alone and in combination

M. Leistra, A.M. Matser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When studying the effect of mixtures of toxic substances on soil organisms, attention must be paid to peculiarities in exposure to mixtures as opposed to that of single toxicants. The fungicides carbendazim and iprodione compete in the adsorption to soil. The presence of iprodione reduced the adsorption of carbendazim by 30%, while carbendazim reduced the adsorption of iprodione by 70%. Iprodione had little effect on the transformation rate of carbendazim in soil. However, carbendazim retarded the transformation of iprodione in soil by 26%. The concentration of the fungicides in pore water was found to be substantially higher for mixtures than when a fungicide alone was present in the soil. The effect of the additional fungicide on the concentration is especially apparent in the period following the first 1 to 2 weeks of the incubation. The inclusion of copper in the mixture has little additional effect on the concentration of the fungicides in pore water.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
JournalJournal of Environmental Science and Health. Part B, Pesticides Food Contaminants, and agricultural wastes
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • enhanced degradation
  • microbial-degradation
  • pore-water
  • pesticides
  • vinclozolin
  • chemicals
  • sorption

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