Adiposity in the older population and the risk of dementia: The Rotterdam Study

Sanne S. Mooldijk, Tosca O.E. de Crom, M.K. Ikram, M.A. Ikram, Trudy Voortman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: We determined associations of total and regional adiposity with incident dementia among older adults. Methods: Within the population-based Rotterdam Study, adiposity was measured as total, android, and gynoid fat mass using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in 3408 men and 4563 women, every 3 to 6 years between 2002 and 2016. Incident dementia was recorded until 2020. Results: Higher adiposity measures were associated with a decreased risk of dementia in both sexes. After excluding the first 5 years of follow-up, only the association of gynoid fat among women remained significant (hazard ratio 0.85 [95% confidence interval 0.75–0.97] per standard deviation increase). No major differences in trajectories of adiposity measures were observed between dementia cases and dementia-free controls. Discussion: Higher total and regional fat mass related to a decreased risk of dementia. These results may be explained by reverse causality, although a protective effect of adiposity cannot be excluded. Highlights: Total and regional adiposity were assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans in 7971 older adults. All adiposity measures were associated with a decreased risk of dementia. The results suggest a beneficial effect of gynoid fat on the risk of dementia in women. Reverse causation and competing risk may explain these inverse associations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2047-2055
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume19
Issue number5
Early online date29 Nov 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

Keywords

  • abdominal fat
  • adiposity
  • body composition
  • dementia
  • obesity

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