Adipokines: A link between obesity and dementia?

Amanda J. Kiliaan, Ilse A.C. Arnoldussen, Deborah R. Gustafson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Being overweight or obese, as measured with body-mass index or central adiposity (waist circumference), and the trajectory of body-mass index over the life course have been associated with brain atrophy, white matter changes, disturbances of blood-brain barrier integrity, and risk of all-cause late-onset dementia and Alzheimer's disease. This observation leads us to question what it is about body-mass index that is associated with health of the brain and dementia risk. If high body-mass index and central adiposity represent an increase in adipose tissue, then the endocrine function of adipose tissue, mediated by adipose tissue hormones and adipokines, could be a clue to mechanisms that underlie the association with dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Hundreds of adipokines have been identified, creating a complexity that is a challenge to simplify. Nonetheless, adipokines are being investigated in association with clinical dementia outcomes, and with imaging-based measures of brain volume, structure, and function in human beings and in preclinical models of clinical dementia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)913-923
Number of pages11
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume13
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adipokines: A link between obesity and dementia?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this