Adaxial/abaxial specification in the regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal opening with respect to light orentation and growth with CO2 enrichment in the C4 species Paspalum dilatatum

A.S. Soares, S.P. Discoll, E. Olmos, J. Harbinson, M.C. Arrabaca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whole-plant morphology, leaf structure and composition were studied together with the effects of light orientation on the dorso-ventral regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance in Paspalum dilatatum cv. Raki plants grown for 6 wk at either 350 or 700 µl l¿1 CO2. Plant biomass was doubled as a result of growth at high CO2 and the shoot:root ratio was decreased. Stomatal density was increased in the leaves of the high CO2-grown plants, which had greater numbers of smaller stomata and more epidermal cells on the abaxial surface. An asymmetric surface-specific regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal conductance was observed with respect to light orientation. This was not caused by dorso-ventral variations in leaf structure, the distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) proteins or light absorptance, transmittance or reflectance. Adaxial/abaxial specification in the regulation of photosynthesis results from differential sensitivity of stomatal opening to light orientation and fixed gradients of enzyme activation across the leaf.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)186-198
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume177
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Keywords

  • elevated co2
  • carbon fixation
  • spinach leaves
  • gas-exchange
  • nadp-me
  • phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase
  • silphium-terebinthinaceum
  • abaxial stomata
  • response curves
  • shade leaves

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adaxial/abaxial specification in the regulation of photosynthesis and stomatal opening with respect to light orentation and growth with CO2 enrichment in the C4 species Paspalum dilatatum'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this