Acrylamide exposure from foods of the Dutch population and an assessment of the consequent risks

E.J.M. Konings, A.J. Baars, J.D. van Klaveren, M.C. Spanjer, P.M. Rensen, M. Hiemstra, J.A. van Kooij, P.W.J. Peters

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    Abstract

    At the end of April 2002, the Swedish Food Administration reported the presence of acrylamide in heat treated food products. Acrylamide has been shown to be toxic and carcinogenic in animals, and has been classified by the WHO/IARC among others as `probably carcinogenic for humans¿. The purposes of this study were firstly to analyse acrylamide contents of the most important foods contributing to such exposure, secondly, to estimate the acrylamide exposure in a representative sample of the Dutch population, and thirdly to estimate the public health risks of this consumption. We analysed the acrylamide content of foods with an LC¿MS¿MS method. The results were then used to estimate the acrylamide exposure of consumers who participated in the National Food Consumption Survey (NFCS) in 1998 (n=6250). The exposure was estimated using the probabilistic approach for the total Dutch population and several age groups. For 344 food products, acrylamide amounts ranged from
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1569-1579
    JournalFood and Chemical Toxicology
    Volume41
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2003

    Keywords

    • maillard reaction
    • chronic toxicity
    • drinking-water
    • rats
    • oncogenicity
    • performance

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    Konings, E. J. M., Baars, A. J., van Klaveren, J. D., Spanjer, M. C., Rensen, P. M., Hiemstra, M., van Kooij, J. A., & Peters, P. W. J. (2003). Acrylamide exposure from foods of the Dutch population and an assessment of the consequent risks. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 41(11), 1569-1579. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0278-6915(03)00187-X