Accumulation of genes for susceptibility to rust fungi for which barley is nearly a nonhost results in two barley lines with extreme multiple susceptibility

G.A. Atienza, H. Jafary, R.E. Niks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nonhost resistance is the most common type of resistance in plants. Understanding the factors that make plants susceptible or resistant may help to achieve durably effective resistance in crop plants. Screening of 109 barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) accessions in the seedling stage indicated that barley is a complete nonhost to most of the heterologous rust fungi studied, while it showed an intermediate status with respect to Puccinia triticina, P. hordei-murini, P. hordei-secalini, P. graminis f. sp. lolii and P. coronata ff. spp. avenae and holci. Accessions that were susceptible to a heterologous rust in the seedling stage were much more or completely resistant at adult plant stage. Differential interaction between barley accessions and heterologous rust fungi was found, suggesting the existence of rust-species-specific resistance. In particular, many landrace accessions from Ethiopia and Asia, and naked-seeded accessions, tended to be susceptible to several heterologous rusts, suggesting that some resistance genes in barley are effective against more than one heterologous rust fungal species. Some barley accessions had race-specific resistance against P. hordei-murini. We accumulated genes for susceptibility to P. triticina and P. hordei-murini in two genotypes called SusPtrit and SusPmur, respectively. In the seedling stage, these accessions were as susceptible as the host species to the target rusts. They also showed unusual susceptibility to other heterologous rusts. These two lines are a valuable asset to further experimental work on the genetics of resistance to heterologous rust fungi.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-79
JournalPlanta
Volume220
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Keywords

  • puccinia-hordei
  • powdery mildew
  • resistance
  • host
  • pathogens
  • defense
  • penetration
  • arabidopsis
  • specificity
  • wheat

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