Absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin-derived ammoniation products in lactating cows

L.A.P. Hoogenboom, J. Tulliez, J.P. Gautier, R.D. Coker, J.P. Melcion, M.J. Nagler, Th.H.G. Polman, J. Delort-Laval

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Abstract

Peanut meal naturally contaminated with 3.5mg/kg aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was spiked with radiolabelled AFB1 (meal14C-I0) and decontaminated by a smallscale copy of an industrial ammoniation process (meal 14C-I1). During the process 15␘f the radioactivity was lost, whereas 90␘f the remaining radiolabel could not be extracted from the meal. In the extractable part, AFB1 accounted for 10␘f the radiolabel, consistent with a total AFB1 reduction of more than 99ÐNo degradation products were observed in the extracts. Four lactating cows were fed with a diet containing 15␘f either meal 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 for 10 days. On day 9 of this treatment, respectively 23 and 67␘f the radiolabel was excreted in the urine and faeces of cows fed meal 14C-I0, as compared with 2 and 101␒n the case of cows fed meal 14C-I1. Milk contained respectively 1.35 (meal 14C-I0) and 0.25ømeal 14C-I1) of the radiolabel. Milk samples taken during the equilibrium stage contained respectively 5 and 0.5 ng/ml of AFB1-derived compounds. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) accounted for 50-80␘f these compounds in the case of milk from cows fed 14C-I0, as compared with 6-20␒n the case of 14C-I1. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates for 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 were estimated to be respectively 0.5 and 5.9ÐOnly liver and kidney samples contained detectable levels of the radiolabel, being respectively 260 and 37 w g/kg for cows fed meal 14C-I0, and 10 and 3 w g/kg for those fed meal 14C-I1. In the latter case, more than 55␘f the radiolabel in the liver could not be extracted, as compared with 90␒n the group fed meal 14C-I1. A small part of the extractable radiolabel in the livers of 14C-I0 could be attributed to AFB1 and cows fed meal AFM1 (less than 1␘f total radioactivity). In the case of the animals fed 14C-I1 there were indications for the presence of AFB1 and AFM1 (6␘f total radioactivity). Decontamination of the highly contaminated (non-radiolabelled) peanut meal by two different industrial ammoniation processes, resulted in a similar reduction of the initial AFB1 levels of 3.5mg/kg to 15 mu g/kg. Feeding of diets containing 15␘f the nontreated and two treated peanut meals to cows for a period of 10 days, resulted in AFM1 levels in milk of respectively 2.1, 0.04 and 0.07 ng/ml. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates were calculated to be respectively 0.5, 2.0, and 3.6ÐIt is concluded that the efficient reduction of aflatoxin levels by ammoniation of contaminated peanut meal results in a strong reduction of aflatoxin-related residues in milk and meat of cows, most likely caused by a decreased bioavailability of the degradation products
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-58
JournalFood Additives and Contaminants
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Aflatoxin B1
Aflatoxins
aflatoxin B1
aflatoxins
Aflatoxin M1
Meals
aflatoxin M1
excretion
cows
peanut meal
Radioactivity
milk
Milk
Liver
Nutrition
liver
Degradation
degradation
Decontamination
Meats

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Hoogenboom, L.A.P. ; Tulliez, J. ; Gautier, J.P. ; Coker, R.D. ; Melcion, J.P. ; Nagler, M.J. ; Polman, Th.H.G. ; Delort-Laval, J. / Absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin-derived ammoniation products in lactating cows. In: Food Additives and Contaminants. 2001 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 47-58.
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title = "Absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin-derived ammoniation products in lactating cows",
abstract = "Peanut meal naturally contaminated with 3.5mg/kg aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was spiked with radiolabelled AFB1 (meal14C-I0) and decontaminated by a smallscale copy of an industrial ammoniation process (meal 14C-I1). During the process 15␘f the radioactivity was lost, whereas 90␘f the remaining radiolabel could not be extracted from the meal. In the extractable part, AFB1 accounted for 10␘f the radiolabel, consistent with a total AFB1 reduction of more than 99{\DH}No degradation products were observed in the extracts. Four lactating cows were fed with a diet containing 15␘f either meal 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 for 10 days. On day 9 of this treatment, respectively 23 and 67␘f the radiolabel was excreted in the urine and faeces of cows fed meal 14C-I0, as compared with 2 and 101␒n the case of cows fed meal 14C-I1. Milk contained respectively 1.35 (meal 14C-I0) and 0.25{\o}meal 14C-I1) of the radiolabel. Milk samples taken during the equilibrium stage contained respectively 5 and 0.5 ng/ml of AFB1-derived compounds. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) accounted for 50-80␘f these compounds in the case of milk from cows fed 14C-I0, as compared with 6-20␒n the case of 14C-I1. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates for 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 were estimated to be respectively 0.5 and 5.9{\DH}Only liver and kidney samples contained detectable levels of the radiolabel, being respectively 260 and 37 w g/kg for cows fed meal 14C-I0, and 10 and 3 w g/kg for those fed meal 14C-I1. In the latter case, more than 55␘f the radiolabel in the liver could not be extracted, as compared with 90␒n the group fed meal 14C-I1. A small part of the extractable radiolabel in the livers of 14C-I0 could be attributed to AFB1 and cows fed meal AFM1 (less than 1␘f total radioactivity). In the case of the animals fed 14C-I1 there were indications for the presence of AFB1 and AFM1 (6␘f total radioactivity). Decontamination of the highly contaminated (non-radiolabelled) peanut meal by two different industrial ammoniation processes, resulted in a similar reduction of the initial AFB1 levels of 3.5mg/kg to 15 mu g/kg. Feeding of diets containing 15␘f the nontreated and two treated peanut meals to cows for a period of 10 days, resulted in AFM1 levels in milk of respectively 2.1, 0.04 and 0.07 ng/ml. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates were calculated to be respectively 0.5, 2.0, and 3.6{\DH}It is concluded that the efficient reduction of aflatoxin levels by ammoniation of contaminated peanut meal results in a strong reduction of aflatoxin-related residues in milk and meat of cows, most likely caused by a decreased bioavailability of the degradation products",
author = "L.A.P. Hoogenboom and J. Tulliez and J.P. Gautier and R.D. Coker and J.P. Melcion and M.J. Nagler and Th.H.G. Polman and J. Delort-Laval",
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Hoogenboom, LAP, Tulliez, J, Gautier, JP, Coker, RD, Melcion, JP, Nagler, MJ, Polman, THG & Delort-Laval, J 2001, 'Absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin-derived ammoniation products in lactating cows', Food Additives and Contaminants, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 47-58. https://doi.org/10.1080/02652030010009165

Absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin-derived ammoniation products in lactating cows. / Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Tulliez, J.; Gautier, J.P.; Coker, R.D.; Melcion, J.P.; Nagler, M.J.; Polman, Th.H.G.; Delort-Laval, J.

In: Food Additives and Contaminants, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2001, p. 47-58.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Absorption, distribution and excretion of aflatoxin-derived ammoniation products in lactating cows

AU - Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

AU - Tulliez, J.

AU - Gautier, J.P.

AU - Coker, R.D.

AU - Melcion, J.P.

AU - Nagler, M.J.

AU - Polman, Th.H.G.

AU - Delort-Laval, J.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - Peanut meal naturally contaminated with 3.5mg/kg aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was spiked with radiolabelled AFB1 (meal14C-I0) and decontaminated by a smallscale copy of an industrial ammoniation process (meal 14C-I1). During the process 15␘f the radioactivity was lost, whereas 90␘f the remaining radiolabel could not be extracted from the meal. In the extractable part, AFB1 accounted for 10␘f the radiolabel, consistent with a total AFB1 reduction of more than 99ÐNo degradation products were observed in the extracts. Four lactating cows were fed with a diet containing 15␘f either meal 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 for 10 days. On day 9 of this treatment, respectively 23 and 67␘f the radiolabel was excreted in the urine and faeces of cows fed meal 14C-I0, as compared with 2 and 101␒n the case of cows fed meal 14C-I1. Milk contained respectively 1.35 (meal 14C-I0) and 0.25ømeal 14C-I1) of the radiolabel. Milk samples taken during the equilibrium stage contained respectively 5 and 0.5 ng/ml of AFB1-derived compounds. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) accounted for 50-80␘f these compounds in the case of milk from cows fed 14C-I0, as compared with 6-20␒n the case of 14C-I1. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates for 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 were estimated to be respectively 0.5 and 5.9ÐOnly liver and kidney samples contained detectable levels of the radiolabel, being respectively 260 and 37 w g/kg for cows fed meal 14C-I0, and 10 and 3 w g/kg for those fed meal 14C-I1. In the latter case, more than 55␘f the radiolabel in the liver could not be extracted, as compared with 90␒n the group fed meal 14C-I1. A small part of the extractable radiolabel in the livers of 14C-I0 could be attributed to AFB1 and cows fed meal AFM1 (less than 1␘f total radioactivity). In the case of the animals fed 14C-I1 there were indications for the presence of AFB1 and AFM1 (6␘f total radioactivity). Decontamination of the highly contaminated (non-radiolabelled) peanut meal by two different industrial ammoniation processes, resulted in a similar reduction of the initial AFB1 levels of 3.5mg/kg to 15 mu g/kg. Feeding of diets containing 15␘f the nontreated and two treated peanut meals to cows for a period of 10 days, resulted in AFM1 levels in milk of respectively 2.1, 0.04 and 0.07 ng/ml. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates were calculated to be respectively 0.5, 2.0, and 3.6ÐIt is concluded that the efficient reduction of aflatoxin levels by ammoniation of contaminated peanut meal results in a strong reduction of aflatoxin-related residues in milk and meat of cows, most likely caused by a decreased bioavailability of the degradation products

AB - Peanut meal naturally contaminated with 3.5mg/kg aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) was spiked with radiolabelled AFB1 (meal14C-I0) and decontaminated by a smallscale copy of an industrial ammoniation process (meal 14C-I1). During the process 15␘f the radioactivity was lost, whereas 90␘f the remaining radiolabel could not be extracted from the meal. In the extractable part, AFB1 accounted for 10␘f the radiolabel, consistent with a total AFB1 reduction of more than 99ÐNo degradation products were observed in the extracts. Four lactating cows were fed with a diet containing 15␘f either meal 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 for 10 days. On day 9 of this treatment, respectively 23 and 67␘f the radiolabel was excreted in the urine and faeces of cows fed meal 14C-I0, as compared with 2 and 101␒n the case of cows fed meal 14C-I1. Milk contained respectively 1.35 (meal 14C-I0) and 0.25ømeal 14C-I1) of the radiolabel. Milk samples taken during the equilibrium stage contained respectively 5 and 0.5 ng/ml of AFB1-derived compounds. Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) accounted for 50-80␘f these compounds in the case of milk from cows fed 14C-I0, as compared with 6-20␒n the case of 14C-I1. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates for 14C-I0 or 14C-I1 were estimated to be respectively 0.5 and 5.9ÐOnly liver and kidney samples contained detectable levels of the radiolabel, being respectively 260 and 37 w g/kg for cows fed meal 14C-I0, and 10 and 3 w g/kg for those fed meal 14C-I1. In the latter case, more than 55␘f the radiolabel in the liver could not be extracted, as compared with 90␒n the group fed meal 14C-I1. A small part of the extractable radiolabel in the livers of 14C-I0 could be attributed to AFB1 and cows fed meal AFM1 (less than 1␘f total radioactivity). In the case of the animals fed 14C-I1 there were indications for the presence of AFB1 and AFM1 (6␘f total radioactivity). Decontamination of the highly contaminated (non-radiolabelled) peanut meal by two different industrial ammoniation processes, resulted in a similar reduction of the initial AFB1 levels of 3.5mg/kg to 15 mu g/kg. Feeding of diets containing 15␘f the nontreated and two treated peanut meals to cows for a period of 10 days, resulted in AFM1 levels in milk of respectively 2.1, 0.04 and 0.07 ng/ml. AFB1 to AFM1 carry-over rates were calculated to be respectively 0.5, 2.0, and 3.6ÐIt is concluded that the efficient reduction of aflatoxin levels by ammoniation of contaminated peanut meal results in a strong reduction of aflatoxin-related residues in milk and meat of cows, most likely caused by a decreased bioavailability of the degradation products

U2 - 10.1080/02652030010009165

DO - 10.1080/02652030010009165

M3 - Article

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SP - 47

EP - 58

JO - Food Additives and Contaminants

JF - Food Additives and Contaminants

SN - 0265-203X

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