Aberrant intestinal microbiota due to IL-1 receptor antagonist deficiency promotes IL-17- and TLR4-dependent arthritis

Rebecca Rogier, Thomas H.A. Ederveen, Jos Boekhorst, Harm Wopereis, Jose U. Scher, Julia Manasson, Sanne J.C.M. Frambach, Jan Knol, Johan Garssen, Peter M. van der Kraan, Marije I. Koenders, Wim B. van den Berg, Sacha A.F.T. van Hijum, Shahla Abdollahi-Roodsaz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Perturbation of commensal intestinal microbiota has been associated with several autoimmune diseases. Mice deficient in interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (Il1rn -/- mice) spontaneously develop autoimmune arthritis and are susceptible to other autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis, diabetes, and encephalomyelitis; however, the mechanisms of increased susceptibility to these autoimmune phenotypes are poorly understood. We investigated the role of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) in regulation of commensal intestinal microbiota, and assessed the involvement of microbiota subsets and innate and adaptive mucosal immune responses that underlie the development of spontaneous arthritis in Il1rn -/- mice.RESULTS: Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we show that IL-1Ra critically maintains the diversity and regulates the composition of intestinal microbiota in mice. IL-1Ra deficiency reduced the intestinal microbial diversity and richness, and caused specific taxonomic alterations characterized by overrepresented Helicobacter and underrepresented Ruminococcus and Prevotella. Notably, the aberrant intestinal microbiota in IL1rn -/- mice specifically potentiated IL-17 production by intestinal lamina propria (LP) lymphocytes and skewed the LP T cell balance in favor of T helper 17 (Th17) cells, an effect transferable to WT mice by fecal microbiota. Importantly, LP Th17 cell expansion and the development of spontaneous autoimmune arthritis in IL1rn -/- mice were attenuated under germ-free condition. Selective antibiotic treatment revealed that tobramycin-induced alterations of commensal intestinal microbiota, i.e., reduced Helicobacter, Flexispira, Clostridium, and Dehalobacterium, suppressed arthritis in IL1rn -/- mice. The arthritis phenotype in IL1rn -/- mice was previously shown to depend on Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Using the ablation of both IL-1Ra and TLR4, we here show that the aberrations in the IL1rn -/- microbiota are partly TLR4-dependent. We further identify a role for TLR4 activation in the intestinal lamina propria production of IL-17 and cytokines involved in Th17 differentiation preceding the onset of arthritis.CONCLUSIONS: These findings identify a critical role for IL1Ra in maintaining the natural diversity and composition of intestinal microbiota, and suggest a role for TLR4 in mucosal Th17 cell induction associated with the development of autoimmune disease in mice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63
JournalMicrobiome
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Autoimmune arthritis
  • IL-1 receptor antagonist
  • Microbiota
  • T helper 17 cells
  • Toll-like receptors

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