A weekly alternating diet between caloric restriction and medium-fat protects the liver from fatty liver development in middle-aged C57BL/6J mice

F. Rusli, M.V. Boekschoten, A.A. Zubia, C. Lute, M.R. Müller, W.T. Steegenga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scope : We aimed to investigate whether a novel dietary intervention consisting of an every-other-week calorie restricted diet could prevent non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) development induced by a medium-fat diet. Methods and results : Nine week-old male C57BL/6J mice received either a 1) control (C), 2) 30E% calorie restricted (CR), 3) medium-fat (MF; 25E% fat) or 4) intermittent (INT) diet, a diet alternating weekly between 40E% CR and an ad libitum MF diet until sacrifice at the age of 12 months. The metabolic, morphological, and molecular features of NAFLD were examined. The INT diet resulted in healthy metabolic and morphological features as displayed by the continuous CR diet: glucose tolerant, low hepatic triglyceride content, low plasma alanine aminotransferase. In contrast, the C- and MF-exposed mice with high body weight developed signs of NAFLD. However, the gene expression profiles of INT-exposed mice differed to those of CR-exposed mice and showed to be more similar with those of C- and MF-exposed mice with a comparable body weight. Conclusions : Our study reveals that the INT diet maintains metabolic health and reverses the adverse effects of the MF diet, thus effectively prevent the development of NAFLD in 12-month-old male C57BL/6J mice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)533-543
JournalMolecular Nutrition & Food Research
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • metabolic syndrome
  • insulin-resistance
  • small-intestine
  • induced obesity
  • adipose-tissue
  • life-span
  • disease
  • prevalence
  • population
  • expression

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