A study of the uptake and biodistribution of nano-titanium dioxide using in vitro and in vivo models of oral intake

Alan MacNicoll, Mick Kelly, Hatice Aksoy, Evelien Kramer, Hans Bouwmeester, Qasim Chaudhry*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Certain food additives may contain a sizeable fraction of particles in the nanoscale. However, little is known about the fate, behaviour and toxicological effects of orally-ingested nanoparticles. This study investigated the uptake and biodistribution of nano- and larger-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) using an in vitro model of gut epithelium and in vivo in rat. The results of the in vivo study showed that oral administration of 5 mg/kg body weight of TiO2 nano- or larger particles did not lead to any significant translocation of TiO2 (measured as titanium) either to blood, urine or to various organs in rat at any of the time intervals studied over a 96 h post-administration period. Different methods used for dispersing particles did not affect the uptake, and orally administered TiO2 was found excreted in the faeces over a period of time. The in vitro study provided further evidence for the lack of translocation of TiO2 across the gut epithelium model. The overall evidence from both in vivo and in vitro studies did not support that oral ingestion of nano- or larger particles of TiO2 via food would result in any significant internal exposure of the consumer to the nanoparticles. The dietary TiO2 nanoparticles are likely to be excreted in the faeces.

Original languageEnglish
Article number66
JournalJournal of Nanoparticle Research : an Interdisciplinary Forum for Nanoscale Science and Technology
Volume17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • Biodistribution
  • Nanoparticle
  • Oral
  • Titanium dioxide
  • Translocation
  • Uptake

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