A social analysis of contested fishing practices in Lake Victoria

M. Medard

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WUAcademic

Abstract

Thesis abstract

The thesis explored how the global market for Nile Perch fish has reconfigured the social and the natural in dramatic ways. The demand for Nile Perch and Dagaa played, willingly or unwillingly, an important role in converting its products into regionally and globally desired commodity. It has also simultaneously restructured the organisation of fisheries into a complex and aggressively managed sector. In fishing and fish trade, one needs to externalize costs and risks to the lower actors in the production and business hierarchy. From an historical point of view, power has shifted from many points of coordination and decision making into a few hands, those that own fishing camps and export processing factory.  Moreover, illegal fishing and trading are continuous and corruption is rife to safe guard individual interest in turn shaping the local practices (governance) of Lake Victoria. Finally the debate about fisheries policies and fisheries regulation in L. Victoria does not address local realities and are largely irrelevant and that the real focus of power and driver of change is the international and regional markets for Nile Perch and Dagaa and global players with a lot of capital.

 

LanguageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Wageningen University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • van Dijk, Han, Promotor
  • Hebinck, Paul, Co-promotor
  • Mwaipopo, R., Co-promotor, External person
Award date28 Apr 2015
Place of PublicationWageningen
Publisher
Print ISBNs9789462572478
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

fishery
global player
market
factory
corruption
commodity
driver
governance
decision making
regulation
demand
costs

Keywords

  • fisheries
  • communities
  • productivity
  • resources
  • development
  • sociology
  • organization
  • fishery management
  • entrepreneurship
  • lakes
  • tanzania

Cite this

Medard, M.. / A social analysis of contested fishing practices in Lake Victoria. Wageningen : s.n., 2015. 278 p.
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title = "A social analysis of contested fishing practices in Lake Victoria",
abstract = "Thesis abstract The thesis explored how the global market for Nile Perch fish has reconfigured the social and the natural in dramatic ways. The demand for Nile Perch and Dagaa played, willingly or unwillingly, an important role in converting its products into regionally and globally desired commodity. It has also simultaneously restructured the organisation of fisheries into a complex and aggressively managed sector. In fishing and fish trade, one needs to externalize costs and risks to the lower actors in the production and business hierarchy. From an historical point of view, power has shifted from many points of coordination and decision making into a few hands, those that own fishing camps and export processing factory.  Moreover, illegal fishing and trading are continuous and corruption is rife to safe guard individual interest in turn shaping the local practices (governance) of Lake Victoria. Finally the debate about fisheries policies and fisheries regulation in L. Victoria does not address local realities and are largely irrelevant and that the real focus of power and driver of change is the international and regional markets for Nile Perch and Dagaa and global players with a lot of capital.  ",
keywords = "visserij, gemeenschappen, productiviteit, hulpbronnen, ontwikkeling, sociologie, organisatie, visserijbeheer, ondernemerschap, meren, tanzania, fisheries, communities, productivity, resources, development, sociology, organization, fishery management, entrepreneurship, lakes, tanzania",
author = "M. Medard",
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language = "English",
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Medard, M 2015, 'A social analysis of contested fishing practices in Lake Victoria', Doctor of Philosophy, Wageningen University, Wageningen.

A social analysis of contested fishing practices in Lake Victoria. / Medard, M.

Wageningen : s.n., 2015. 278 p.

Research output: Thesisinternal PhD, WUAcademic

TY - THES

T1 - A social analysis of contested fishing practices in Lake Victoria

AU - Medard, M.

N1 - WU thesis, no. 6016

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Thesis abstract The thesis explored how the global market for Nile Perch fish has reconfigured the social and the natural in dramatic ways. The demand for Nile Perch and Dagaa played, willingly or unwillingly, an important role in converting its products into regionally and globally desired commodity. It has also simultaneously restructured the organisation of fisheries into a complex and aggressively managed sector. In fishing and fish trade, one needs to externalize costs and risks to the lower actors in the production and business hierarchy. From an historical point of view, power has shifted from many points of coordination and decision making into a few hands, those that own fishing camps and export processing factory.  Moreover, illegal fishing and trading are continuous and corruption is rife to safe guard individual interest in turn shaping the local practices (governance) of Lake Victoria. Finally the debate about fisheries policies and fisheries regulation in L. Victoria does not address local realities and are largely irrelevant and that the real focus of power and driver of change is the international and regional markets for Nile Perch and Dagaa and global players with a lot of capital.  

AB - Thesis abstract The thesis explored how the global market for Nile Perch fish has reconfigured the social and the natural in dramatic ways. The demand for Nile Perch and Dagaa played, willingly or unwillingly, an important role in converting its products into regionally and globally desired commodity. It has also simultaneously restructured the organisation of fisheries into a complex and aggressively managed sector. In fishing and fish trade, one needs to externalize costs and risks to the lower actors in the production and business hierarchy. From an historical point of view, power has shifted from many points of coordination and decision making into a few hands, those that own fishing camps and export processing factory.  Moreover, illegal fishing and trading are continuous and corruption is rife to safe guard individual interest in turn shaping the local practices (governance) of Lake Victoria. Finally the debate about fisheries policies and fisheries regulation in L. Victoria does not address local realities and are largely irrelevant and that the real focus of power and driver of change is the international and regional markets for Nile Perch and Dagaa and global players with a lot of capital.  

KW - visserij

KW - gemeenschappen

KW - productiviteit

KW - hulpbronnen

KW - ontwikkeling

KW - sociologie

KW - organisatie

KW - visserijbeheer

KW - ondernemerschap

KW - meren

KW - tanzania

KW - fisheries

KW - communities

KW - productivity

KW - resources

KW - development

KW - sociology

KW - organization

KW - fishery management

KW - entrepreneurship

KW - lakes

KW - tanzania

M3 - internal PhD, WU

SN - 9789462572478

PB - s.n.

CY - Wageningen

ER -