A single-scattering approximation for infrared radiative transfer in limb geometry in the Martian atmosphere

Armin Kleinböhl*, John T. Schofield, Wedad A. Abdou, Patrick G.J. Irwin, Remco J. de Kok

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a single-scattering approximation for infrared radiative transfer in limb geometry in the Martian atmosphere. It is based on the assumption that the upwelling internal radiation field is dominated by a surface with a uniform brightness temperature. It allows the calculation of the scattering source function for individual aerosol types, mixtures of aerosol types, and mixtures of gas and aerosol. The approximation can be applied in a Curtis-Godson radiative transfer code and is used for operational retrievals from Mars Climate Sounder measurements. Radiance comparisons with a multiple scattering model show good agreement in the mid- and far-infrared although the approximate model tends to underestimate the radiances in realistic conditions of the Martian atmosphere. Relative radiance differences are found to be about 2% in the lowermost atmosphere, increasing to ~10% in the middle atmosphere of Mars. The increasing differences with altitude are mostly due to the increasing contribution to limb radiance of scattering relative to emission at the colder, higher atmospheric levels. This effect becomes smaller toward longer wavelengths at typical Martian temperatures. The relative radiance differences are expected to produce systematic errors of similar magnitude in retrieved opacity profiles.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1568-1580
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Quantitative Spectroscopy and Radiative Transfer
Volume112
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Infrared
  • Limb geometry
  • Mars
  • MCS
  • Scattering

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