A naturally occurring splicing site mutation in the Brassica rapa FLC1 gene is associated with variation in flowering time

Y.X. Yuan, J. Wu, R.F. Sun, X.W. Zhang, D.H. Xu, A.B. Bonnema, X.W. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), encoding a MADS-domain transcription factor in Arabidopsis, is a repressor of flowering involved in the vernalization pathway. This provides a good reference for Brassica species. Genomes of Brassica species contain several FLC homologues and several of these colocalize with flowering-time QTL. Here the analysis of sequence variation of BrFLC1 in Brassica rapa and its association with the flowering-time phenotype is reported. The analysis revealed that a G/A polymorphism at the 5¿ splice site in intron 6 of BrFLC1 is associated with flowering phenotype. Three BrFLC1 alleles with alternative splicing patterns, including two with different parts of intron 6 retained and one with the entire exon 6 excluded from the transcript, were identified in addition to alleles with normal splicing. It was inferred that aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA leads to loss-of-function of BrFLC1. A CAPS marker was developed for this locus to distinguish Pi6+1(G) and Pi6+1(A). The polymorphism detected with this marker was significantly associated with flowering time in a collection of 121 B. rapa accessions and in a segregating Chinese cabbage doubled-haploid population. These findings suggest that a naturally occurring splicing mutation in the BrFLC1 gene contributes greatly to flowering-time variation in B. rapa
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1299-1308
JournalJournal of Experimental Botany
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • l. ssp pekinensis
  • locus-c flc
  • brassica-rapa
  • arabidopsis-thaliana
  • chinese-cabbage
  • trait loci
  • vernalization
  • expression
  • repressor
  • pathways

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