A model integrating social-cultural concepts of nature into frameworks of interaction between social and natural systems

Andreas Muhar*, Christopher M. Raymond, Riyan J.G. van den Born, Nicole Bauer, Kerstin Böck, Michael Braito, Arjen Buijs, Courtney Flint, Wouter T. de Groot, Christopher D. Ives, Tamara Mitrofanenko, Tobias Plieninger, Catherine Tucker, Carena J. van Riper

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Existing frameworks for analysing interactions between social and natural systems (e.g. Social-Ecological Systems framework, Ecosystem Services concept) do not sufficiently consider and operationalize the dynamic interactions between people's values, attitudes and understandings of the human-nature relationship at both individual and collective levels. We highlight the relevance of individual and collective understandings of the human-nature relationship as influencing factors for environmental behaviour, which may be reflected in natural resource management conflicts, and review the diversity of existing social-cultural concepts, frameworks and associated research methods. Particular emphasis is given to the context-sensitivity of social-cultural concepts in decision-making. These aspects are translated into a conceptual model aiming not to replace but to expand and enhance existing frameworks. Integrating this model into existing frameworks provides a tool for the exploration of how social-cultural concepts of nature interact with existing contexts to influence governance of social-ecological systems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)756-777
JournalJournal of Environmental Planning and Management
Volume61
Issue number5-6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • environmental behaviour
  • governance
  • human-nature relationship
  • social-ecological system

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