A metabolomics approach to identify factors influencing glucosinolate thermal degradation rates in Brassica vegetables

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Abstract

Thermal processing of Brassica vegetables can lead to substantial loss of potential health-promoting glucosinolates (GLs). The extent of thermal degradation of a specific GL varies in different vegetables, possibly due to differences in the composition of other metabolites within the plant matrices. An untargeted metabolomics approach followed by random forest regression was applied to identify metabolites associated to thermal GL degradation in a segregating Brassica oleracea population. Out of 413 metabolites, 15 were associated with the degradation of glucobrassicin, six with that of glucoraphanin and two with both GLs. Among these 23 metabolites three were identified as flavonols (one kaempferol- and two quercetinderivatives) and two as other GLs (4-methoxyglucobrassicin, gluconasturtiin). Twenty quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these metabolites, which were associated with glucoraphanin and glucobrassicin degradation, were identified on linkage groups C01, C07 and C09. Two flavonols mapped on linkage groups C07 and C09 and co-localise with the QTL for GL degradation determined previously.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-297
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume155
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Glucosinolates
thermal degradation
Metabolomics
Brassica
Vegetables
metabolomics
glucosinolates
Metabolites
Pyrolysis
Hot Temperature
vegetables
metabolites
glucoraphanin
glucobrassicin
Flavonols
degradation
Quantitative Trait Loci
flavonols
linkage groups
Degradation

Keywords

  • quantitative trait loci
  • mass-spectrometry
  • red cabbage
  • oleracea
  • flavonols
  • health
  • leaves
  • tool

Cite this

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title = "A metabolomics approach to identify factors influencing glucosinolate thermal degradation rates in Brassica vegetables",
abstract = "Thermal processing of Brassica vegetables can lead to substantial loss of potential health-promoting glucosinolates (GLs). The extent of thermal degradation of a specific GL varies in different vegetables, possibly due to differences in the composition of other metabolites within the plant matrices. An untargeted metabolomics approach followed by random forest regression was applied to identify metabolites associated to thermal GL degradation in a segregating Brassica oleracea population. Out of 413 metabolites, 15 were associated with the degradation of glucobrassicin, six with that of glucoraphanin and two with both GLs. Among these 23 metabolites three were identified as flavonols (one kaempferol- and two quercetinderivatives) and two as other GLs (4-methoxyglucobrassicin, gluconasturtiin). Twenty quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these metabolites, which were associated with glucoraphanin and glucobrassicin degradation, were identified on linkage groups C01, C07 and C09. Two flavonols mapped on linkage groups C07 and C09 and co-localise with the QTL for GL degradation determined previously.",
keywords = "quantitative trait loci, mass-spectrometry, red cabbage, oleracea, flavonols, health, leaves, tool",
author = "K. Hennig and {de Vos}, R.C.H. and C.A. Maliepaard and M. Dekker and R. Verkerk and G. Bonnema",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.01.062",
language = "English",
volume = "155",
pages = "287--297",
journal = "Food Chemistry",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - A metabolomics approach to identify factors influencing glucosinolate thermal degradation rates in Brassica vegetables

AU - Hennig, K.

AU - de Vos, R.C.H.

AU - Maliepaard, C.A.

AU - Dekker, M.

AU - Verkerk, R.

AU - Bonnema, G.

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Thermal processing of Brassica vegetables can lead to substantial loss of potential health-promoting glucosinolates (GLs). The extent of thermal degradation of a specific GL varies in different vegetables, possibly due to differences in the composition of other metabolites within the plant matrices. An untargeted metabolomics approach followed by random forest regression was applied to identify metabolites associated to thermal GL degradation in a segregating Brassica oleracea population. Out of 413 metabolites, 15 were associated with the degradation of glucobrassicin, six with that of glucoraphanin and two with both GLs. Among these 23 metabolites three were identified as flavonols (one kaempferol- and two quercetinderivatives) and two as other GLs (4-methoxyglucobrassicin, gluconasturtiin). Twenty quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these metabolites, which were associated with glucoraphanin and glucobrassicin degradation, were identified on linkage groups C01, C07 and C09. Two flavonols mapped on linkage groups C07 and C09 and co-localise with the QTL for GL degradation determined previously.

AB - Thermal processing of Brassica vegetables can lead to substantial loss of potential health-promoting glucosinolates (GLs). The extent of thermal degradation of a specific GL varies in different vegetables, possibly due to differences in the composition of other metabolites within the plant matrices. An untargeted metabolomics approach followed by random forest regression was applied to identify metabolites associated to thermal GL degradation in a segregating Brassica oleracea population. Out of 413 metabolites, 15 were associated with the degradation of glucobrassicin, six with that of glucoraphanin and two with both GLs. Among these 23 metabolites three were identified as flavonols (one kaempferol- and two quercetinderivatives) and two as other GLs (4-methoxyglucobrassicin, gluconasturtiin). Twenty quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for these metabolites, which were associated with glucoraphanin and glucobrassicin degradation, were identified on linkage groups C01, C07 and C09. Two flavonols mapped on linkage groups C07 and C09 and co-localise with the QTL for GL degradation determined previously.

KW - quantitative trait loci

KW - mass-spectrometry

KW - red cabbage

KW - oleracea

KW - flavonols

KW - health

KW - leaves

KW - tool

U2 - 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.01.062

DO - 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.01.062

M3 - Article

VL - 155

SP - 287

EP - 297

JO - Food Chemistry

JF - Food Chemistry

SN - 0308-8146

ER -