A framework to assess life cycle nitrogen use efficiency along livestock supply chains

U.A. Uwizeye, G. Tempio, P.J. Gerber, R. Schulte, I.J.M. de Boer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paperAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

to the significant contribution of the livestock sector to nitrogen (N) losses, improving N use efficiency (NUE-N) along the life cycle of livestock products is one of the important step towards increasing production performance and reduction of its environmental impacts. We developed a comprehensive framework and novel metrics to assess NUE-N along the livestock supply chain (i.e. -to-primary- ). Our framework was illustrated for the case study of mixed dairy production in Western Europe. Metrics developed included the life cycle NUE-N; total N losses to the environment per unit of N in the final co-products; and the N hotspot index (NHI-N), defined as the relative evenness of the N losses along the supply chain. Averaged across countries, the life cycle NUE-N was 36¿3.1%, N losses were 6.6¿1.8 g N per g N in the final animal co-products, and NHI-N of 1.0¿0.1. The N losses and NHI-N also revealed large differences in hotspots across supply chains, and allowed to identify priority areas where improvement actions are necessary to enhance the efficiency. We show that the combination of life cycle NUE-N, N losses and NHI-N gives valuable information to guide N management in livestock supply chains
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Life Cycle Assessment Food Conference (LCA Food 2014)
Pages1398-1407
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event9th International Conference Life Cycle Assessment of Food Conference (LCA Food 2014), San Francisco, USA -
Duration: 8 Oct 201410 Oct 2014

Conference

Conference9th International Conference Life Cycle Assessment of Food Conference (LCA Food 2014), San Francisco, USA
Period8/10/1410/10/14

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