A decision-tree to optimise control measures during the early stage of a foot-and-mouth disease epidemic

F.H.M. Tomassen, A. de Koeijer, M.C.M. Mourits, A. Dekker, A. Bouma, R.B.M. Huirne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A decision-tree was developed to support decision making on control measures during the first days after the declaration of an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD). The objective of the tree was to minimise direct costs and export losses of FMD epidemics under several scenarios based on livestock and herd density in the outbreak region, the possibility of airborne spread, and the time between first infection and first detection. The starting point of the tree was an epidemiological model based on a deterministic susceptible–infectious–recovered approach. The effect of four control strategies on FMD dynamics was modelled. In addition to the standard control strategy of stamping out and culling of high-risk contact herds, strategies involving ring culling within 1 km of an infected herd, ring-vaccination within 1 km of an infected herd, and ring-vaccination within 3 km of an infected herd were assessed. An economic model converted outbreak and control effects of farming and processing operations into estimates of direct costs and export losses. Ring-vaccination is the economically optimal control strategy for densely populated livestock areas whereas ring culling is the economically optimal control strategy for sparsely populated livestock areas
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-324
JournalPreventive Veterinary Medicine
Volume54
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

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