A comparison between legume technologies and fallow, and their effects on maize and soil traits, in two distinct environments of the West African savannah

A.C. Franke, G. Laberge, B.D. Oyewole, S. Schulz, O. Tobe

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    16 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Legume¿maize rotation and maize nitrogen (N)-response trials were carried out simultaneously from 1998 to 2004 in two distinct agro-ecological environments of West Africa: the humid derived savannah (Ibadan) and the drier northern Guinea savannah (Zaria). In the N-response trial, maize was grown annually receiving urea N at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 kg N ha¿1. In Ibadan, maize production increased with N fertilization, but mean annual grain yield declined over the course of the trial. In Zaria, no response to N treatments was observed initially, and an increase in the phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) fertilizer application rate was required to increase yield across treatments and obtain a response to N applications, stressing the importance of non-N fertilizers in the savannah. In the rotation trial, a 2-year natural fallow¿maize rotation was compared with maize rotated with different legume types: green manure, forage, dual-purpose, and grain legumes. The cultivation of some legume types resulted in a greater annual maize production relative to the fallow¿maize combination and corresponding treatments in the N-response trial, while there was no gain in maize yield with other legume types. Large differences in the residual effects from legumes and fallow were also observed between sites, indicting a need for site-specific land management recommendations. In Ibadan, cultivation of maize after the forage legume (Stylosanthes guianensis) achieved the highest yield. The natural fallow¿maize rotation had improved soil characteristics (Bray-I P, exchangeable potassium, calcium and magnesium) at the end of the trial relative to legume¿maize rotations, and natural fallow resulted in higher maize yields than the green manure legume (Pueraria phaseoloides). In Zaria, maize following dual-purpose soybean achieved the highest mean yield. At both sites, variation in aboveground N and P dynamics of the legume and fallow vegetation could only partly explain the different residual effects on maize
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)117-135
    JournalNutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems
    Volume82
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

    Fingerprint

    fallow
    savannas
    legumes
    maize
    corn
    soil
    green manures
    residual effects
    forage
    comparison
    effect
    Pueraria phaseoloides
    Stylosanthes guianensis
    exchangeable potassium
    Guinea
    forage legumes
    fertilizer application
    land management
    Western Africa
    application rate

    Keywords

    • biological nitrogen-fixation
    • increased crop production
    • northern guinea savanna
    • forage legumes
    • continuous cultivation
    • fertility management
    • farming systems
    • agropastoral systems
    • livestock systems
    • organic-matter

    Cite this

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    title = "A comparison between legume technologies and fallow, and their effects on maize and soil traits, in two distinct environments of the West African savannah",
    abstract = "Legume¿maize rotation and maize nitrogen (N)-response trials were carried out simultaneously from 1998 to 2004 in two distinct agro-ecological environments of West Africa: the humid derived savannah (Ibadan) and the drier northern Guinea savannah (Zaria). In the N-response trial, maize was grown annually receiving urea N at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 kg N ha¿1. In Ibadan, maize production increased with N fertilization, but mean annual grain yield declined over the course of the trial. In Zaria, no response to N treatments was observed initially, and an increase in the phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) fertilizer application rate was required to increase yield across treatments and obtain a response to N applications, stressing the importance of non-N fertilizers in the savannah. In the rotation trial, a 2-year natural fallow¿maize rotation was compared with maize rotated with different legume types: green manure, forage, dual-purpose, and grain legumes. The cultivation of some legume types resulted in a greater annual maize production relative to the fallow¿maize combination and corresponding treatments in the N-response trial, while there was no gain in maize yield with other legume types. Large differences in the residual effects from legumes and fallow were also observed between sites, indicting a need for site-specific land management recommendations. In Ibadan, cultivation of maize after the forage legume (Stylosanthes guianensis) achieved the highest yield. The natural fallow¿maize rotation had improved soil characteristics (Bray-I P, exchangeable potassium, calcium and magnesium) at the end of the trial relative to legume¿maize rotations, and natural fallow resulted in higher maize yields than the green manure legume (Pueraria phaseoloides). In Zaria, maize following dual-purpose soybean achieved the highest mean yield. At both sites, variation in aboveground N and P dynamics of the legume and fallow vegetation could only partly explain the different residual effects on maize",
    keywords = "biological nitrogen-fixation, increased crop production, northern guinea savanna, forage legumes, continuous cultivation, fertility management, farming systems, agropastoral systems, livestock systems, organic-matter",
    author = "A.C. Franke and G. Laberge and B.D. Oyewole and S. Schulz and O. Tobe",
    year = "2008",
    doi = "10.1007/s10705-008-9174-2",
    language = "English",
    volume = "82",
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    A comparison between legume technologies and fallow, and their effects on maize and soil traits, in two distinct environments of the West African savannah. / Franke, A.C.; Laberge, G.; Oyewole, B.D.; Schulz, S.; Tobe, O.

    In: Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems, Vol. 82, No. 2, 2008, p. 117-135.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A comparison between legume technologies and fallow, and their effects on maize and soil traits, in two distinct environments of the West African savannah

    AU - Franke, A.C.

    AU - Laberge, G.

    AU - Oyewole, B.D.

    AU - Schulz, S.

    AU - Tobe, O.

    PY - 2008

    Y1 - 2008

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    AB - Legume¿maize rotation and maize nitrogen (N)-response trials were carried out simultaneously from 1998 to 2004 in two distinct agro-ecological environments of West Africa: the humid derived savannah (Ibadan) and the drier northern Guinea savannah (Zaria). In the N-response trial, maize was grown annually receiving urea N at 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 kg N ha¿1. In Ibadan, maize production increased with N fertilization, but mean annual grain yield declined over the course of the trial. In Zaria, no response to N treatments was observed initially, and an increase in the phosphorus (P) and sulphur (S) fertilizer application rate was required to increase yield across treatments and obtain a response to N applications, stressing the importance of non-N fertilizers in the savannah. In the rotation trial, a 2-year natural fallow¿maize rotation was compared with maize rotated with different legume types: green manure, forage, dual-purpose, and grain legumes. The cultivation of some legume types resulted in a greater annual maize production relative to the fallow¿maize combination and corresponding treatments in the N-response trial, while there was no gain in maize yield with other legume types. Large differences in the residual effects from legumes and fallow were also observed between sites, indicting a need for site-specific land management recommendations. In Ibadan, cultivation of maize after the forage legume (Stylosanthes guianensis) achieved the highest yield. The natural fallow¿maize rotation had improved soil characteristics (Bray-I P, exchangeable potassium, calcium and magnesium) at the end of the trial relative to legume¿maize rotations, and natural fallow resulted in higher maize yields than the green manure legume (Pueraria phaseoloides). In Zaria, maize following dual-purpose soybean achieved the highest mean yield. At both sites, variation in aboveground N and P dynamics of the legume and fallow vegetation could only partly explain the different residual effects on maize

    KW - biological nitrogen-fixation

    KW - increased crop production

    KW - northern guinea savanna

    KW - forage legumes

    KW - continuous cultivation

    KW - fertility management

    KW - farming systems

    KW - agropastoral systems

    KW - livestock systems

    KW - organic-matter

    U2 - 10.1007/s10705-008-9174-2

    DO - 10.1007/s10705-008-9174-2

    M3 - Article

    VL - 82

    SP - 117

    EP - 135

    JO - Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

    JF - Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems

    SN - 1385-1314

    IS - 2

    ER -