Data from: Artificial selection on introduced Asian haplotypes shaped the genetic architecture in European commercial pigs

Dataset

Description

Early pig farmers in Europe imported Asian pigs to cross with their local breeds in order to improve traits of commercial interest. Current genomics techniques enabled genome-wide identification of these Asian introgressed haplotypes in modern European pig breeds. We propose that the Asian variants are still present because they affect phenotypes that were important for ancient traditional, as well as recent, commercial pig breeding. Genome-wide introgression levels were only weakly correlated with gene content and recombination frequency. However, regions with an excess or absence of Asian haplotypes (AS) contained genes that were previously identified as phenotypically important such as FASN, ME1, and KIT. Therefore, the Asian alleles are thought to have an effect on phenotypes that were historically under selection. We aimed to estimate the effect of AS in introgressed regions in Large White pigs on the traits of backfat (BF) and litter size. The majority of regions we tested that retained Asian deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) showed significantly increased BF from the Asian alleles. Our results suggest that the introgression in Large White pigs has been strongly determined by the selective pressure acting upon the introgressed AS. We therefore conclude that human-driven hybridization and selection contributed to the genomic architecture of these commercial pigs.
Date made available2 Dec 2015
PublisherWageningen University & Research

Cite this

Bosse, M. (Creator), Soares Lopes, M. (Creator), Madsen, O. (Creator), Megens, H. (Creator), Crooijmans, R. (Creator), Frantz, L. (Creator), Harlizius, B. (Creator), Bastiaansen, J. (Creator), Groenen, M. (Creator) (2 Dec 2015). Data from: Artificial selection on introduced Asian haplotypes shaped the genetic architecture in European commercial pigs. Wageningen University & Research. 10.5061/dryad.g40f0